Written by Tasneem Mohammed

 

With the media raising concerns every hour, your Whatsapp blowing up with videos of people bulk buying and social media bombarded with negativity, the topic at hand is only Corona – it’s difficult to not panic.

Not to mention the risks this pandemic is adding to our livelihood.

However, much like other viruses that have taken the world by surprise, this one can be overcome too. We could well be in this crisis for the long haul – but instead of allowing worry to take over your day and more importantly, your mind, perhaps it’s time to look to for more positivity in your day, and be thankful for what we have.

Here are a few easy tips to aid positive mental health during this period of isolation:

 

Your body is stronger than you think

Know your body is a fighter. We come in to contact with over 60,000 germs a day – imagine what that means for over a lifetime. Your body is equipped with guerilla warfare antibodies to fight and learn diseases. 

Take advice from known sources. It’s easy to forget, the media relies on shocking headlines to sell stories and encourage you to click their website. Stick to credible advice from sources such as Gov.UK and NHS who have the most up to date, reliable information. Avoid fake news from sources that come from sites circulated around social media.

And don’t forget to make time to exercise – maintaining your physical wellness is just as important as your mind.

 

Be thankful for water

You are lucky to have access to water – use it. Frequently. Gov.UK have said:

‘Wash your hands more often than usual, for 20 seconds using soap and hot water, particularly after coughing, sneezing and blowing your nose, or after being in public areas where other people are doing so.’ Luckily, we have water unlike other countries, so utilise this resource – and be thankful for it.

 

Woosa

You may be familiar with the phrase ‘woosa’, known for its calming effect on Martin Lawrence playing Marcus alongside Will Smith. The point is, when you feel overwhelmed, learn calming techniques through YouTube tutorials that will help you not only through Covid anxiety, but also in other parts of your life when it becomes stressful. Being isolated, it’s easy to get frustrated. Not only can you partake in calming techniques, but a whole host of activities such as that exercise classes online to improve your health.

 

Don’t stock up on food

As tempting as it is to top up on foods that may prevent Covid19, or if you feel you need to panic buy in the event of a shortage, don’t. It’s not helpful for the community, and we have been informed that there will be plenty of supply by supermarket giants. Provided you’re shopping responsibly, here are some options to stay healthy and fight potential illness:

  • Vitamin C: Can shorten cold-like symptoms but will not stop an infection. These items are oranges, kiwi fruits, red peppers, grapefruit, spinach, cauliflower, brussel sprouts and organ meats.
  • Mediterranean diet: You know what it is…a colourful plate. The best way to have essential nutrients to fight off bugs is by including antioxidants and anti-inflammatory fruit and vegetables. Try the colours of the rainbow to be effective in this approach.
  • Echinacea: A herb found to reduce respiratory infections in children called A. Vogel Echinaforce drops. There are lots of different variations of this herb. So being accurate and buying from a trusted source is essential.
  • Vitamin D: A study found 11 percent of people from 11,000 across 14 countries had a reduced rate of respiratory infections when consuming vitamin D supplements. The UK sees a high number of people with deficiencies. So ensuring you take them on time is important. 
  • Zinc: As it is not produced naturally, we need to include this in our diets. The best way to inherit this is through sourdough bread, lean beef, cheese and yoghurt.

 

 

Connect to loved ones

Fortnite. The word itself sends a sense of aggravation through most parents. But gaming is a place where excitement increases and boredom decreases. You may not be a teenager, but you can sure finally act like one again. 

If you are unlucky enough to be in self-isolation, understand you are lucky enough to still communicate. That coffee-catch up that never materialised? Now is the perfect time. If you haven’t already, download Skype, use Face-time or use your Whatsapp to familiarise yourself with speaking to people via video and have that coffee over the phone.

 

Stay occupied

Learn a new skill that might boost your career or enhance your knowledge. Find the best sellers online, and order it right to your door. And if that requires too much effort, a Netflix binging session can occupy your mind too.

 

Plan for the future

We won’t be in this position forever – we just need to get through the storm. Plan ahead for your future, and especially your career. Tailor CVs for jobs or companies you’re interested in, practice cover letters, and you can also find plenty of advice online about interviewing – or just join our webinar. Whatever you choose to do, don;t give up, and know that we are here to help. you can find more careers advice here.

Every dark cloud has a silver lining. It’s just a matter of perspective. It is important to look back at any bad experiences in your life and think, how did I overcome them?

Recognise what your triggers are so you can learn to think yourself to a more positive mindset using the points above. If you involve all these steps daily, you will be on track to an easier day. And remember, it’s okay to not be okay. If all else fails, download TikTok, the new social media app and try to master all the latest dance crazes in the safety of your own home!

 

Important things to note

NHS Helpline: 111 if you experience dry cough or fever. Self isolate, do not visit your GP and avoid contact with others

Mind.Org: Coronavirus – Plan your isolation

Britbox: A free 7 day trial of all time British favourites

Calm: The #1 App for Meditation and Sleep

Classes and support to maintain your physical wellness at home: Barrebalance (offering online classes), mind.org.uk

 

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