As an airworthiness engineer, you are likely to have an immense set of skills as well as a wealth of experience and technical knowledge. However, without a fantastic CV that succinctly demonstrates these achievements, you’ll struggle to land your dream job. A CV is still an essential tool for recruitment and making sure your airworthiness engineer CV is up to scratch can help you to further your career.

With that in mind, what do you need to make sure you focus on when crafting your airworthiness engineer CV? Here are the top 3 elements:

 

The profile

The personal profile is essentially the introduction to you and your CV. It is not an edited summary of your CV. Instead, it is the selling pitch that can help recruiters to determine whether your CV is worth reading or not.

Typically, a profile will only be around four sentences long or take up a maximum of 150 words. As a result, it needs to be concise, compelling and powerful. After reading your profile, recruiters should be able to determine who you are based on your professional achievements and how you can benefit potential employers.

Your profile should succinctly answer who you are, what you offer and your future career goals. You should achieve this by demonstrating skills, experiences and achievements backed up with facts and figures. As a result, you provide recruiters with a clear and concise overview that will make them want to read your CV detail.

 

Your most recent role

As recruiters typically spend less than ten seconds reading a CV, you need to make sure that the information they are looking for is easy to find. After your profile, your most recent experience and most recent role should come up next.

Make sure your roles have clear headers so that recruiters can quickly scan your career history. However, your most recent role should be the most detailed one, because recruiters will be most interested in your recent work. In this section of your CV, you need to bullet point your most prominent responsibilities, skills and give some sample achievements.

As an airworthiness engineer, it is likely that past roles have had a multidisciplinary approach, which may make it hard to determine what are the most notable skills and achievements to include in your CV. However, you can make sure that your CV is as relevant as possible by highlighting keywords and skills mentioned in the job description. Therefore, you can ensure your most recent role reflects the aspects that recruiters are looking for.

 

Your technical skills

In any engineering role, the success of your application will primarily come down to the technical skills you possess, so make sure that these are clear and easy to find on your CV. With your technical skills, organise them in a way that will appeal to recruiters. This often means researching the job description and determining which skills the employer is prioritising. Make sure these key skills are then at the top of the skills section on your CV. You can further reinforce your technical skills with a quick summary of your accomplishments and abilities within that skill.

 

When highlighting your skills, make sure you back up the skills with your experience and proficiency level. Don’t say you are ‘an expert’ instead prove your proficiency with the time spent using the skill and the qualifications that show this. Don’t add skills that you have little experience in; you will only be found out during the interview stages.

By focusing on these three most important aspects of your airworthiness engineer CV, you then have a solid basis and structure in place for a great application that recruiters will love.

 

Andrew Fennell is the founder of CV writing advice website StandOut CV – he is a former recruitment consultant and contributes careers advice to websites like Business Insider, The Guardian and FastCompany.

 

Want more CV advice? Download our CV template for an Airworthiness Engineer below!

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