How to improve your communication skills as a cabin crew member

How to improve your communication skills as a cabin crew member

Working as a cabin crew member or flight attendant means that you need to interact with your passengers. There’s no way around it, you must be able to make positive impressions on your passengers by having the right social and communication skills. This article will cover the basic information you need to know to be an excellent flight attendant. 

There are two different types of communication when it comes to dealing with people in general, but for our context dealing with passengers: verbal and non-verbal. In the customer service world, face to face interactions all come down to these two types of communication and knowing how to handle both will make or break your career as a cabin crew member. 

 

Verbal Communication

There are two main components of verbal communication which you need to always be aware of, and these are your tone of voice and your choice of words. People will interpret a lot from the tone of your voice, and it’s completely different when you speak to different people in your life like your family, friends, colleagues, or your boss. You need to be able to use the right tone to convey what you’re saying to your passengers to leave them with the right impression, whether you need to be friendly (almost always) or firm (sometimes necessary). Even if the passenger in 24A is rude and frustrating, think about the tone you’re using in your replies. 

In terms of your word choice, this is also important, because coming off as flippant or not serious will not go over well with your passengers. Also, sarcasm is very rarely well-received in the customer service world, so leave that one at home. Pamela Knight, a communication manager at Write My X and 1Day2Write, tells her readers to “make sure you’re not interrupting your passengers or trying to finish their sentences for them. It’s important to avoid coming off as too bossy or assertive when dealing with passengers, so think about passive turns of phrase, and choose the words carefully. Try different pitches and intonations to see how they come across.”

 

Non Verbal Communication

Non verbal communication is just as important, if not more, as verbal communication. This includes how you look and dress, whether your uniform is in good condition, and your hair is in place. This reflects on the company and your professionalism so you want to make a good impression. Also be mindful of your smell; obviously, body odour is extremely unpleasant, but you can also do too much and be wearing an overpowering perfume. In a crowded airplane, a strong perfume can be very off-putting for passengers, not to mention some might be allergic to scents.  

You should also be aware of the eye contact you make when you interact with passengers. It’s important to make eye contact to show you’re listening and interested in what they’re saying, but don’t keep it for too long because it’ll seem like you’re staring. In fact, body language is very important as a cabin crew member. According to Greta Vandercourt, a recruiter at Next Coursework and Brit Student, “gestures like folding your arms or leaning against the cabin door can appear too casual or off-putting, not the impression you want to be projecting. You also don’t want to be seen slouching or slumping as this does not look professional and makes you appear disengaged. You also want to avoid too many hand-gestures when you’re speaking because this can be interpreted as nervousness, similarly to fidgeting or constantly readjusting your hair or clothes.” 

When the passenger is speaking, lean forward to engage them and show your interest, nodding occasionally to show you’re paying attention and you understand what they’re saying, especially if there’s a language barrier. You should be turning your entire body to face them when they’re talking to you, and not just turn your head towards them. Under no circumstances should you be rolling your eyes or even frowning; try to keep a genuine smile on your face during your passenger interactions.  

Good communication, both verbal and non verbal, is at the base of every positive customer interaction, and it’s essential to master them to become a great cabin crew member. 

April Smith, a multimedia journalist at Academic Brits and PhD Kingdom, is dedicated to sharing her communication and interview tips with her readers. She has written her whole life and now she is using her skills as a writer to share helpful insights with her readers at Origin Writings.

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Mental health care for a happy flying career

Mental health care for a happy flying career

The freedom and excitement of travelling the world is a pleasure you want to keep and enjoy for as long as you fly. To do that, a little bit of housekeeping is in order to make sure you get the best out of your time in the air. Physical and mental health matter in this respect, so let’s look at how you can make sure the only blues you see are blue skies.

Mental health in the workplace often comes up in conversation nowadays, because it is costing the workplace a lot. More than just money, it costs workers their livelihood if not taken care of. To avoid the perils of bad mental health, you have to understand the signs, and be able to see them in your colleagues and those you hold dear, and more importantly, yourself.

The World Health Organisation W.H.O. has this to say about mental health:

  • Mental health is more than the absence of mental disorders.
  • Mental health is an integral part of health; indeed, there is no health without mental health.
  • Mental health is determined by a range of factors, including environmental ones.

 

 

What has that got to do with me you might ask? 

Just because you swap an office in the sky for an office on the ground doesn’t mean you escape the stresses of the regular workplace. Oftentimes juggling home life and travel-heavy work life can be equally taxing. It is about knowing how the lifestyle you now lead can get out of balance if you let it, what to do to bring balance back, and where to get help if you need it. Let’s begin with a common misconception about the flying lifestyle.

As glamorous as flying is from the outside, people tend to get the impression that things are 100 percent fantastic all the time for a glamorous crew! Scratch the surface and you find that cabin crew are normal people too, even if they have a ready smile and go beyond the normal customer service expectations. As such, people don’t always check in with their glamorous crew friend and family member because they are having the time of their life, right? Well, not every day. 

 

Speak up and to the right people

This is where communication is important. Communication is a two-way street and you need to be comfortable speaking up when you are not having a good day and when you need that little extra support from those around you. As a group of people, crew get into the habit of putting others before themselves. While this can be a valuable trait for teamwork, there is often nothing to give others if you don’t take care of your health first. 

 

Do you know what the starting signs are?

Mental health has an association with stress, anxiety, and depression, which in turn are reflected in hormonal health. The constant change in travel conditions, environments and circumstances beyond your control all feature in a flier’s lifestyle and can make some, more sensitive than most. Be mindful of how you do and don’t manage stresses that come with the job. One top tip besides sharing your feelings and being heard is to make sure you get regular exercise. This raises the feel-good factors your body produces known as endorphins. They literally change your biochemistry and help banish stress, anxiety and depression.

 

Good tips to stay balanced

What self-help steps can you take to keep everything ticking over? I briefly mentioned regular exercise, but it is worth repeating again for emphasis. Something as simple as going for a brisk walk has the ability to clear your head and lift your spirit, making it harder to be in the doldrums. Checking-in with yourself mentally is a good thing to do to every once in a while to create awareness of how you feel emotionally. One of the most valuable tools has to be the ability to turn to a fellow crew member who really understands the lifestyle you lead, so make friends easily so you can support them and be supported in return.

Another tip is to be mindful of the effect of the seasons on your hormonal health. Seasonal Affected Disorder otherwise known as SAD, is when you don’t get enough daylight in winter and the long winter months negatively influence your hormones, usually from autumn till the start of spring. If you are affected by SAD, recognising it, and nipping it in the bud can halt a spiral into unwanted mental health symptoms started by disrupted hormone patterns.

Having someone to call to talk to in any eventuality should always be an option, be it crew, friend, family or even a friendly ear from a professional organisation like the Samaritans. You may be pleased to know that some airlines have similar in-house services or arrangements with such organisations. If all else fails there is nothing like a wee galley chat in the small hours over a hot beverage to put the world to right and lift the spirits. Happy Landings!

About Christopher

Christopher Babayode is a former flight attendant of 20 years with British Airways, a specialist in Travel Wellness and healthy jet lag solutions for those who travel often. He is the author of Farewell Jet Lag, Cures from a Flight Attendant (on Amazon UK & US). Chris has been featured in the Sunday Telegraph and is a most -read author on Quora the questions and answers platform.

Christopher will also be guest speaking at our event later on this year, at the Aviation Job Expo!

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What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

As part of the airline cabin crew assessment day, you may be asked to perform a series of tests, writes Patricia Green.

I am often asked on the forum what are involved in these, so thought it would be helpful to cover them in more detail here! They are not there to be difficult or to trick you but to see if you have the basic knowledge skills that a cabin crew member needs.

Tests do differ from airline to airline and the questions here are examples taken from different airlines over the last year. There are also a few simple tips I can give you – it is all in the preparation! If it’s your dream to become a member of cabin crew, you’ll want to take a look at this:

 

What does the cabin crew assessment day consist of?

Cabin crew assessment days are held when airlines are recruiting for individuals to work for them – more specifically (as you’ve probably guessed), cabin crew members. Assessment days with airlines are never easy, and the day is split into different, smaller assessments where you’ll need to shine. The below outlines the types of tests you’ll face on your assessment day. 

 

The reach test

Firstly, there is the ‘reach test’ this is the first and most important, as it is as simple as passing the test or failing the whole assessment day. You must be able to reach to 210 cm for most airlines. This is without shoes, and you will be allowed on tip toes with either one or both hands, and fingertips reaching to the marker.

You do need to be able to do this as you have to be able to reach the safety equipment onboard the aircraft in the overhead lockers. Do mark a point on the wall and practice reaching it every day – it is surprising how many people miss this opportunity by not realising how important it is! Some airlines in Asia, in particular, have a slightly lower reach test, as do some of the regional airlines, depending on aircraft type, so these are worth considering if you cannot reach the marker.

 

 

Mathematics test

The maths test always worries everyone, but you don’t have to be a star maths pupil to survive it, just think practically. It will involve using basic maths in a cabin crew situation – so for example:

• A meal cart fits 6 trays horizontally and 12 trays vertically, how many trays are there in the cart?
• A passenger buys 2 coffees at 2.99 GBP and gives you 10.00 GBP, what change do you give?

Also, consider currency exchange (they will give you the rate…and you may get a calculator) so with the last question:

• What if they gave you 10 euros? What change would you give? The rate is 1.10.

Basically, if you have passed your maths GCSE or equivalent as the requirements ask, then you will be fine!

 

 

Language test

The English test used by some of the airlines in the Middle East is about an hour long. It does change and subjects will differ, but just as an idea of what to expect:

You’ll be asked to read a cabin crew story – you must then answer 5 multiple choice questions about the story to check your understanding.

  • Match the task to text – this checks that you understand the meaning of words e.g. reliable, considered etc. and phrases such as ‘take it or leave it’ for example.
  • Read a cover letter – answer 5 multiple choice questions about it
    Essay – write about a specified subject. ‘Who is your inspiration and why?’, or ‘If I ruled a country, which country would I rule and why?’ or ‘What traits do you like or not like about yourself? How and why would you change them?’

 

If you are worried about your English skills, there are books and courses online that specialise in English for Cabin Crew, so it may be worth perfecting your fluency. The current standard for cabin crew in Aviation English is ICAO level 4, but you do not need a special qualification.

Foreign language speakers may also be asked to complete a test in their alternate language to check fluency level, if they are being recruited for language skills. This is often an oral test with a recruiter who speaks your language.

 

 

General knowledge test

Of course, no two airline tests are the same, so you can just use this as a basic guide for the assessment day. There may also be a general knowledge test which includes things like geography, airport codes, currency or the 24 hour clock.

While you do not need to study any of these in detail, they will also be useful for your training once you get through. Do take a look also, at the airline’s route map (learn some airport codes…) and also research the aircraft fleet and the airline’s current product and history. This will really help you shine in your tests and show professional knowledge in the final interview stage.

 

Group test

The group exercise will help recruiters to establish whether you have the soft skills required to perform well as a member of cabin crew. Every day your role will require you to work in a group, so you should have a good understanding of how to work with various scenarios like being under time pressure, climate and other stress factors, communicating openly with people of diverse backgrounds and positions, listening to instructions or complaints and being able to problem solve quickly. 

You will face a complex task in a group of 8-12 people, all who will differ in personality (another complication you will have to deal with). This allows them to see how you will react to other personalities and approaches, therefore how you will react in a work environment. You will likely be assessed on the following competencies:

  • Growth mindset
  • Positivity
  • Teamwork
  • Time management
  • Active listening
  • Initiative
  • Motivation and enthusiasm
  • Creativity
  • Decision making
  • Cultural awareness

 

Avoid arguing, taking on tasks you weren’t delegated, talking over others and dominating the conversation, and not trusting others to help. 

 

Interview

In advance of your assessment day it’s important to review common cabin crew interview questions and how to answer them. This will be an important part of your assessment, so be sure you are fully prepared to impress. Speak clearly and calmly, and have a background knowledge of the airline to fall back on. Sit up straight and don’t slouch – show positive body language and posture. Avoid crossing your arms and legs, and remember to smile.

 

About the Author:

Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant.

She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit Cabin Crew Consultant.

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Step 4…the online application

Step 4…the online application

Following on from our article from last month Step three – How do I target my CV to Specific Airlines? we look this month at the process of applying online.

As I’ve said before, I would always advise first taking a look at the requirements for the airline or airlines that you’re thinking of applying to, to make sure that you can meet the basic job requirements.  

We have our own range of airline guides at Cabin Crew Wings, and you can browse through them here.

 

First Things First…

Make sure you know what you’ll need to have to hand when completing the online application. Some airlines ask you to upload a cover letter or copy of your CV, and some will ask you to upload photos at this stage.  Make sure you have everything saved in the correct format, and that your documents are error-free and up to date.

 

Spelling and Grammar

Although the application form will generally involve a lot of ‘tick-box’ questions, there will be other areas where you’ll be expected to fill out sections with personal information, or sometimes even answer a question or provide a short personal summary.

It’s really important that you proof-read these sections for spelling or grammar errors, as mistakes here not only look unprofessional, but will be picked up on by the recruitment team.

 

Screening Questions

Quite often at the start of the online application you will be asked to complete some simple screening questions. These are designed to make sure that you understand the requirements of the role, and that you are aware of things like height and reach restriction rules.

 

Next Steps

After completing and submitting your online assessment you’ll receive an email confirming it’s been received.

Some airlines use sophisticated screening software to process your form, to check if you’re a good ‘fit’ for crewing with them. If this is the case you’ll usually hear back quite quickly with an email confirming whether or not your initial application has been successful – sometimes even on the same day.

If you’ve made it through to the next stage a few things could happen, depending on which airline you’ve applied to. Most commonly you’ll be asked to complete a series of short psychometric ability tests. These types of test can seem daunting if you’ve never came across them before, but try not to worry – they’re in place to examine your personality and character to see how suited you’d be to the cabin crew role. They’re usually in a multiple choice format, where you choose how you would react to a certain scenario, or behave in a given situation.

There’s also the possibility that you could be asked to take part in a short telephone or video interview with the recruitment team.

You’ll always receive full instructions on how to complete the next step of the process, and given a contact in the recruitment team who you can chat to if you have any questions – please do give them a call if you’re unsure about anything, they’re there to help you!

 

The Assessment Day

If you make it through these next steps you’ll usually be invited to an airline Assessment Day.  We’ll cover this in detail in a future article, but this is normally a whole-day event with lots of potential candidates, where recruiters screen potential crew in exercises like role-plays and group discussions, before interviewing the most promising applicants on a one to one basis.

Next month we’ll look at some of the screening procedures I’ve mentioned in more detail, starting with the psychometric ability tests, in Step Five – the Psychometric Tests.

 

Step 4…the online application

Following on from our article from last month Step three – How do I target my CV to Specific Airlines? we look this month at the process of applying online.As I’ve said before, I would always advise first taking a look at the requirements for the airline...

Top on the job tips for new cabin crew

Top on the job tips for new cabin crew

What is it that makes a great cabin crew member shine? Besides good customer service, it is their personality. You may have experienced it yourself – there is that one person among many who is more approachable and pleasant to interact with, they leave you feeling good about yourself and it seems effortless like they are not even trying. Wouldn’t it be great if you took to the skies like that and impress all those around you with your likeability and skillset from day one? Your secret weapon will always be your people skills. These next 8 tips are going to help you hone those skills to make you irresistible as a friend, colleague and valued team member.

 

Make friends easily

You are going to spend time with lots of different people, some will be passengers, some will be colleagues and some will be total strangers, being able to communicate effectively with all these people will definitely help things along. The quicker you can connect with people on their wavelength, the easier and more enjoyable your job becomes, even if you have to deliver bad news.

Become a social butterfly. The best way to do this is to develop the skill of making friends outside of the normal type of friend circle you are used to. This will cause you to look for what you have in common with people and help build good feelings both ways. Humour and sincere complements will also make you a nice person to be around and your passengers and colleagues will turn to you because they want to have a good time and memorable experiences when they travel.

 

Develop your listening skills

We all have something to say but being able to actively listen is a tool worth learning to make all our communications more effective. It can be the difference between a conversation getting out of hand and a person feeling heard, even if there is not a lot you can do about the situation. Becoming a good listener helps you get known as a person who has empathy, and people relate to you as being on their side, which is exactly where you want to be.

 

Smart presentation matters

When you put on that uniform you are representing your airline and its brand. When you walk through the airport and serve passenger all eyes are on you. You are always in the spotlight and having and maintaining a smart appearance is important. It goes without saying that you should look smart, but attention to detail is even more important – especially so if you want to be selected to work in the premium cabins. Your airline will probably give you a uniform wearer’s guide which will cover the basics of appearance, but personal hygiene and etiquette are also important, getting these right may not be commented on but they won’t go unnoticed.

 

Watch out for good customer service experiences

Good presentation and great personality allows you to be yourself. When you are at ease it rubs off on the team you work with and your passengers. When you work like this it allows you to be creative and attentive with your customer service. I found myself automatically recognising and appreciating good customer service in my own life and oftentimes I was able to apply some of what I experienced in my role as cabin crew. Make it a habit to notice and appreciate good customer service wherever you find it in your life and apply it appropriately.

 

Learn a language

Language can be a great icebreaker and it is a good skill to have especially in the travel industry. Even if you are not fluent, having some vocabulary and friendly banter can go a long way in making your audience feel at ease. These days with a little effort and the help of the likes of Google Translate you can impress and break down communication barriers easily. The biggest pay off is that even if you don’t pronounce things word perfect people appreciate the effort you made.

 

Stay curious about your passengers

Keeping your curiosity fresh and alive adds variety to your workday. You have a constant stream of new faces either going to or coming from work or leisure trips, so it shouldn’t be too hard to connect with people wanting to share their experiences. This helps you in your role as a friendly face and can be personally enriching. I’ve seen crews being invited to James Brown concerts, get backstage passes to shows, get stock market tips that paid off, all from having friendly chats with passengers. You just never know who you might meet.

 

Work from checklists

In the beginning you will have much to learn and new procedures to follow for the different types of service, aircraft, and ad hoc duties to perform on and off the plane. Having checklists was a very useful tool to have to make sure I learnt quickly and performed as required. I would recommend the same to you. Once you get the hang of things they will become second nature and you can discard the lists. As a team your teammates are relying on you so you all get the job done to a standard.

 

Volunteer

If you want to really experience variety in the job, step into a leadership role, or make your flying career a fun learning experience, volunteer often and step out of your comfort zone. It doesn’t matter that you might not get it right and do things perfectly every time. You will find yourself acquiring new skills and confidence which reinforces a can do attitude to life even in the face of obstacles and disruptions.There is no better way to position yourself for other opportunities in the airline.

About Christopher

Christopher Babayode is a former flight attendant of 20 years with British Airways, a specialist in Travel Wellness and healthy jet lag solutions for those who travel often. He is the author of Farewell Jet Lag, Cures from a Flight Attendant (on Amazon UK & US). Chris has been featured in the Sunday Telegraph and is a most -read author on Quora the questions and answers platform.

Christopher will also be guest speaking at our event later on this year, at the Aviation Job Expo!

Flight engineer job description

A flight engineer is a vital team member in ensuring the safety of passengers and a fully working aircraft, engineers conduct crucial checks and testing before the aircraft is deemed worthy for travel. The role of a flight engineer is a rewarding and...

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Why your cabin crew application has not progressed

Why your cabin crew application has not progressed

Meet Kirsty, who has provided this really in-depth piece below about your cabin crew application! Listen to Kirsty’s quick audio intro!

I’ve been watching all of the comments on the various Cabin Crew Facebook and LinkedIn groups and a common theme has emerged;

‘I’ve applied for a Cabin Crew role but have not heard anything, or have not progressed to interview’.

There is nothing more disheartening when you know this career is for you, but you are not progressing in the recruitment process.  

After 20 years working in aviation recruitment and interview coaching (see our cabin crew preparation programs here) I can take they mystery out of the process and tell you that if you have not progressed it is for two reasons:

 

  1. You have not met the minimum requirements for the role or
  2. You have not made an impression with your application

 

If you have not meet the minimum requirements you will be automatically sifted out of the recruitment process, so ensure you have your RSA and First Aid certificate and have checked off that you have provided all the information they requested in the job outline. Just one little thing missing could mean your application is sidelined.

Next, after you have checked and re-checked that, we need to look at your cover letter and resume.  These documents either get you to interview stage or not. That makes them extremely important. Yet, candidates spend very little time ensuring they are doing the best job for them.

 

The key mistakes I see candidates make in their cover letter are:

  1. They don’t address the selection criteria to show that they meet all of the requirements.
  2. They write generic paragraphs or fluffy statements.
  3. They write about themselves and only what they want.
  4. They don’t address what motivates them to this particular airline.
  5. They don’t address the brand values of the airline.

 

So, if your cover letter is using fluffy generic language and is just about you, it is 100% letting you down.

 

Now you might be thinking, I am a people person not a writer!  

I get that, and lets face it, the airlines want you out there in front of the passengers doing what you do best but you still have to get past this first stage… the application. So do your research, there’s lots of help out there.

Give yourself the best chance of success and ensure your documents wow the airline recruitment team, market you effectively and progress you to interview.

Here’s to your career taking off!

 

Author, speaker, career coach and entrepreneur, Kirsty thrives on the diversity and innovation of business in the coaching space. Founding Pinstripe Solutions in 2000 in response to the collapse of Ansett Airlines her Executive Coaching business has grown to specialize in Pilot, Cabin Crew, Aircraft Engineering, and Aviation Corporate Interview Preparation. Her team of off-site coaches works worldwide in 15+ countries via a unique online business model. Amassing an incredible social media following through relentless blogging and career hub contributions, Kirsty uses her platform to advocate for aviation as a career, to mentor and encourage self-knowledge, change and innovation. Kirsty has recently joined the Advisory Board for ‘Inflighto’ (www.inflighto.com) a groundbreaking industry app Kirsty has presented at Griffith and Sydney Universities, industry forums and drives airline careers through her Secondary School talks and Mentoring programs.

Kirsty is a monthly contributor to Australian Aviation Magazine, Aerotime.aero and Aviation Job Search. She has been interviewed for: Reuters, News.com, Marie Claire Magazine and Coaching Life. Listen to her interviews as a guest on iTunes leading podcast ‘Go All In’ and Australian Aviation Radio.

www.pinstripesolutions.com | kirsty@pinstripesolutions.com 

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