5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks of that may help you stay organised and optimise that precious luggage space even further.

Here’s the top 5!

⦁ Pack your belt in the collar of a shirt; this will save space and help to keep your collar crisp.

⦁ Use the complimentary shower caps to put your shoes in… It will save your clothes from getting dirty and will help avoid scuffs on your shoes.

⦁ Place a dryer sheet in your bag to keep your clothes smelling fresh during transit. It takes up minimal space and avoids that musty smell when you unpack at the other end.

⦁ Use masking tape around toiletry bottles tops to avoid spillage (it works!)

⦁ It sounds uncool, but make a packing list – or download a free one! Check everything off, and then put the list in your case so that you can use it to pack on your way home. Get your free packing list by clicking the red button.

Why GATE8?

Besides packing smartly, choosing the right luggage can go a long way in making your travels as hassle-free as possible. At GATE8 they work closely with the business travel community to develop a range of cabin bags that answer the most pressing of travel gripes – from crease-free garment storage to keeping your tech & valuables safe and close to hand, discover the range at GATE8Luggage.com.

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities...

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks...

Best ways to find a guilt-free work balance

Best ways to find a guilt-free work balance

With our modern lifestyles becoming more and more dynamic, the debate on what work-life balance means proves to be quite relevant today. We caught up with Daniel Ross, Marketing Executive at Roubler to see what he had to say on this pressing issue. 

Work-life balance is defined as the extent to which a person feels fulfilled in both professional and personal aspects of their life. Basically, it’s when you achieve a healthy combination of work and play. What is interesting is how subjective it is for each one of us. For some, it might mean being able to leave work early or having weekends totally free. For others, it might mean having a completely flexible schedule. Ultimately, only you can perceive if your life is in balance or not.  

 

History

The concept of work-life balance emerged as early as the 18th century when the first laws were enacted to limit the number of working hours allowed for employees. Laws supporting mandatory leave for particular life events, such as childbirth and illnesses, were also passed.

This was largely spurred on by the influx of women in the workforce, who lobbied for shorter working weeks and flexible schedules to be able to juggle work and caring for their families. Nowadays, the discussion on work-life balance includes all working individuals, and even identifies distinct groups such as single parents.

 

Established Effects

People who consider themselves to have a balanced work and personal life generally have lower levels of stress and depression, and higher levels of satisfaction in life. In contrast, work-life imbalance is also associated with elevated levels of the “stress hormone” cortisol, increased blood pressure and heart rate, ill health, and depression.

These effects have an impact in both aspects of our lives. On a professional level, for instance, work-life balance translates to pro-social behavior, engagement, and productivity, while failure to achieve it results in absenteeism, job dissatisfaction, and burnout. On a personal level, engagement in relationships, personal development, and good self-esteem are associated with work-life balance, while guilt, regret, and depression tend to occur without it.

 

Why Is It Hard to Achieve?

Now that we have established the importance of work-life balance, the big question is, “Why is it hard to achieve?” Hectic lifestyles combined with ubiquitous technology may have something to do with it.

In the era of the Internet, computers, and mobile phones, convenient access to these portable technologies can blur the boundaries between work and non-work tasks, especially with provisions like flexible work hours, telecommuting (working from home), and others. Gadgets enable us to work from our cars and homes, from planes and cafes—places that used to be traditionally non-work spaces. On the flip side, employees can bring personal activities (e.g. texting, online shopping, logging in to social media accounts) into the workplace. This blurring of boundaries leads to work hours spilling over into non-work hours, and vice-versa, causing imbalance and conflict between the two.

 

Ways to Have Work-Life Balance

It can be challenging to achieve a proper work-life balance given our numerous roles and responsibilities, but there are a few strategies that may help you actualise it:

 

Organize and Prioritize

It’s best to start with tracking your daily activities and estimating how much time is dedicated to each. Afterwards, try to prioritise: what’s non-negotiable, what can be flexible, and what’s not really important? Whether it’s cooking dinner for your kids, or working on your board presentation, or having a date night once a week—it will be an eye-opener on what really matters to you.

Check if your non-negotiables are mostly personal commitments or professional ones, or more or less an equal mix of the two. This will show you whether the hours spent between these two facets are uneven and if they in fact spill over into each other. Here you can already start the process of balancing your hours for a more even distribution of time and effort.

 

Segment, Multitask, and Neglect

It’s a cause for concern when work and personal roles begin to overlap, because one role could either benefit or harm the other, and most of us can only juggle so much before reaching the breaking point. It pays to set firmer boundaries between work and non-work activities, or what we refer to as “segmenting.”

This is particularly difficult to do in our digital age when technology blurs boundaries. But with a little effort, it can be done. Segment when you’re engaging in non-negotiable activities: pay attention during an important meeting, be fully present when playing with your kids, and don’t check your phone every five seconds when you’re out with friends.

Now for tasks that you’ve deemed flexible (e.g., cleaning the house, watching a new TV series, picking your kid up from practice) you can actually multitask while doing these activities, or even occasionally neglect them. It’s all about prioritizing: neglect what you can, multitask when you can, and segment what you love.

 

Take Care of Yourself

Work-life balance isn’t just about figuring out how to best be of service to other people, it means figuring out how to best care for yourself. Set aside your own me-time every day when you can recharge through simple activities like reading, exercising, pampering, satisfying a food craving, or just plain relaxing. It’s not about being vain — you need to be healthy and happy to be able to give your best at work and at home.

Work-life balance is strongly associated with health, wellbeing, and personal and professional relationships. Prioritizing work and non-work demands may not always be easy, but with a lot of planning, consideration, and zero guilt, you can determine what matters most to you and strike that perfect balance between work and play

 

Who is the author?

Daniel Ross is part of the marketing team at Roubler — a time and attendance software platform founded in Australia. Their mission is to change the way the world manages its workforces.

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities...

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks...

The busy Pilots guide on being kind to yourself

The busy Pilots guide on being kind to yourself

In the busy world of being a pilot, it’s become increasingly important to be more proactive in taking care of yourself and your mental well being. As we’re a caring bunch over here at Aviation Job Search, we’ve compiled our top 7 quick ways on how to be kind to yourself today… and everyday!

 

Take the time to congratulate yourself

In a hectic working world, you can be so far swept up in the present that you can’t even see how far you’ve come. Take the time to reflect and congratulate yourself for everything you’ve achieved. By having positive feelings towards yourself and your accomplishments, you’ll ultimately feel better, stronger and more positive about your future goals.

 

Listen to your body

Being a pilot is one of the most tiring jobs on the planet so if you’re feeling overwhelmed, stop and listen to your body. Only you will truly understand how your body works and functions. Why not try some daily relaxation techniques such as yoga and meditation? A simple 10 minutes at home everyday can have a significant effect on your mental and physical health by relieving stress and strengthening your immune system.

Struggling with jet lag? Read our top 9 tips from other aviation professionals on how to conquer it.  

 

Let it out

Working as a pilot can be extremely tiring and challenging. Take the time to process how work makes you feel rather than bottling it all up. Simply writing your feelings down in a journal is a great outlet for processing emotions and increasing self awareness. By putting your thoughts onto paper, you’re calling your wandering mind to engage with your thoughts. Thus, past frustrations and future anxieties are lost in the present moment and mindfulness is achieved.

 

Have a little fun

While your working hours will often be tiring, challenging and stressful, there’s still time for a little fun in every single day. Whether your idea of fun is a glass of wine after work, playing with your kids or simply watching your favourite comedy, it’s true what they say – laughter is the best medicine.

Laughing is one of the most effective things you can do to reboot your energy and optimism towards life. Laughter is that good, it’s even been proven to be good for your health by strengthening your immune system and protecting you from the damaging effects of stress.

 

Give to others

Studies have shown that giving makes us far happier than receiving so in a strange twist of fate, you’re actually being selfish and selfless by giving to others.  

The act of giving activates a region in the brain associated with pleasure, social connection and trust which thus creates a ‘warm glow’ effect. Scientists also believe that altruistic behaviour releases endorphins in the brain and produces the positive feeling known as the ‘helpers high.’

 

Appreciate the people in your life

After years of working away, these can eventually take their toll on the relationships around you. In fact, the divorce rate amongst some pilot groups is as high as 75%.  

That being said, take a little time every day to appreciate the people in your life. Even simple acts such as washing up after dinner or calling to say you love them (Hey, if it’s good enough for Stevie Wonder) can make a big difference.

 

Nourish your body

Staying healthy as a pilot isn’t easy. However, while it’s difficult, it’s not impossible to take care of your body as long as you’re organised and prepare your meals in advance. Choosing the right foods will improve your mood, energy levels and mental acuteness – all great for long distance travelling.

 

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the world’s no.1 job website for aviation recruitment. If you’re looking for a new challenge, why not browse 100’s of jobs near you right now.

Looking to recruit in 2018? Look no further, simply give us a call on 01772 639605 or visit our online checkout to get your job live in minutes.

 

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities...

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks...

Coping with stress at work

Coping with stress at work

Do you often find yourself feeling overwhelmed at work? Well, you’re not alone; workplace stress is much more common than you might think. We spoke to Anna Pitts from the Graduate Recruitment Bureau to find out how to be stress free at work. She has shared three of her top strategies for managing stress in the workplace.

Workplace stress is extremely common and the sad truth is that it’s on the rise. Most professionals would admit to suffering from stress at busy times of the year, particularly when deadlines and targets come into play. Recent figures from Friends Life showed that last year alone, 5 million workers were affected by stress – and the reality is, it doesn’t have to be this way. Anna Pitts of the Graduate Recruitment Bureau explains what to do if you’re stressed, and more importantly what your employers can and should do to alleviate their employees of this burden.

 

1. Keep communication channels open

Stress can be intensified by a lack of communication or unclear instructions, and this is particularly the case for professionals who have the added pressure of deadlines, targets and client expectations. Ambiguity on tasks or lax detail surrounding important projects or deadlines only serves to heighten stress levels. You are entitled to a clear brief about each project and you should be supported by your team and employer throughout each venture.

Having an accessible and supportive manager will drastically decrease stress levels, and the reverse is also true. If you feel like there is a lack of communication or brief between you and your boss then ask if you can speak to them about it. Ask for the channel of communication to stay open as you need access to them to do your job properly.

Even little things such as not answering emails, failure to sign off on tasks outside of your control or even lazy instructions can all contribute to an unnecessary level of stress. The chances are your boss hasn’t realised they aren’t helping things as they are busy themselves, so a gentle nudge should improve the situation.

 

2. Don’t overload yourself

Another major contributor to workplace stress is work overload. You’re a person, not a machine and sometimes the powers that be can forget this. You may find that the to-do list keeps growing until it’s a terrifying length. This isn’t right. It is ok to turn down extra tasks if you physically have no time in the day to do them. Politely explain that while you would love to work on this extra assignment, you actually have your hands full with the other three that you are currently working on. Additionally, it is ok to ask for help from your colleagues and manager. There’s no shame in being too busy and your employers would rather you spoke up before you have to be signed off for stress.

 

3. It’s all about give and take

It is important that everyone on your team pulls their weight. If you’re a great worker, and everyone knows this, you can get roped in to doing more than your fair share. Having a good team around you takes a massive weight off your shoulders, so make sure that your colleagues are putting in the same amount of work and effort as you. If you seem to be the only one working and as a result are suffering from stress, then something needs to be done. Have a meeting with your line manager to raise the issues concerning you. Make sure you take some form of evidence along just in case, but the chances are they will know what a valuable asset to the company you are and respect your opinion and worries. There’s no harm in going above and beyond your job description, but make sure you aren’t doing everyone else’s job for them.

Clear communication is key in a working environment; a lack of this, combined with an excessive workload, unrealistic deadlines and unmotivated colleagues all send stress levels soaring. The good news is these can all be solved. Stress needn’t rule your life, and it shouldn’t. Make sure if you start to feel weighed down and depressed at work that you nip it in the bud as soon as possible. Your manager, colleagues and HR department are all there to support you. Solutions are available and, if utilised, stress will be a thing of the past.

 

Who are we?

We are Aviation Job Search, the world’s no.1 job website for aviation recruitment. If you’re looking for a new challenge, why not browse 100’s of jobs near you right now? Looking to recruit in 2018? Look no further, simply give us a call on 01772 639605 or visit our online checkout to get your job live in minutes.

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities...

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks...

How to conquer jet lag: The professional’s guide

How to conquer jet lag: The professional’s guide

One of the most common questions asked to aviation professionals is ‘How do you cure jet lag?’ If you’ve ever had the misfortune of suffering from jet lag, you’ll understand how challenging it is, so how do the professionals who work flying the skies cope with continuous long distance travel?

Despite it being their job, pilots and cabin crew aren’t immune to the effects of jet lag. Call it an occupational hazard but aviation professionals just have to manage it as best they can. In fact, most pilots are provided with education on managing their jetlag through their airlines risk management programs. Flight regulations are in place to prevent pilots from becoming overly tired and affecting performance when flying through multiple time zones.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled our top 9 secret tips and tricks of the trade from real aviation professionals from around the world.

 

Before we get started, what is jet lag?

The human body operates on a circadian rhythm where light determines whether it’s time to be awake or asleep. When the eye cells detect low light, it sends a message to a tiny organ in the brain called the pineal gland, which thus releases the sleep inducing hormone, melatonin. By crossing numerous time zones, it creates an imbalance in your rhythm which the body typically takes one day per time zone passed through to adjust.

When your internal body clock is thrown out of sync and the jet lag kicks in, it typically leaves you in a zombie like state, manifesting through poor concentration, irritable behaviour and disrupted sleep patterns.

 

So how do the professionals conquer it?

 

1. Stay hydrated

It sounds like a cliche but drink as much water as you can before and during the flight. Cabin air is particularly dry and the body can become dehydrated fairly quickly. This results in reduced kidney functions and less blood flowing to your muscles, all of which trigger the effects of jet lag.   

System Chief Pilot at Southwest Airlines, R.J Deutschendorf says, ‘Being hydrated is one of the best things you can do for anyone who travels.’

Looking for an additional boost? Captain Suzanne Skeeters, a long haul commercial pilot recommends mixing your water with powdered electrolytes containing essential minerals to keep your body at optimal balance.

 

  1. Avoid alcohol and caffeine

Reaching for post flight stimulants might seem like a good idea but alcohol can severely disrupt your sleeping patterns. After drinking alcohol, the sleep inducing chemical adenosine increases which speeds up the body falling asleep. However, the chemical subsides fairly quickly which can result in you waking up in the middle of the night.

It’s also advisory to limit your caffeine intake. Deutschendorf says, ‘When you’re a pilot and you do get fatigued, that half a cup of coffee will affect you more. It will keep you more alert, as opposed to somebody who drinks coffee all day long and becomes immune to it’ so ‘save the caffeine boost for when you really need it.’

 

  1. Eat healthy

The benefits of a healthy diet and lifestyle is well documented and experts believe that maintaining a good diet can help with the effects of jet lag. A good mixture of protein, fruit, vegetables and (some) carbs will help stabilise your blood sugar levels. A diet consisting of high sugar levels will give you a momentary high followed by a crash afterwards.

Kara Mulder, a private flight attendant, advises others to prepare their healthy snacks in advance and eat them little and often. By preparing them in advance, it also helps you to choose healthy options during busy periods.

 

  1. Exercise

Essentially, airline professionals need to listen to their body. If you’re tired, do take a nap but limit the time you spend asleep. When you wake, moderate exercise will help to boost your energy levels and mood while adjusting back to your body’s natural rhythm.

Even a brisk walk or some press ups in your hotel room can help keep jet lag at bay. Qantas pilot, Shane Thompson, says ‘Exercise is the single best way to acclimatise in my experience.’  

Furthermore, Kuwait Airways advises their staff to keep active during the flight by twisting, stretching and walking up and down the aisles.

 

  1. Get some sleep

Ensuring you have the right hotel arrangements can be crucial to finally getting that good night’s sleep. Ensure your hotel of choice is in a quiet location and that it’s cool and dark. A fully dark room ensures that you’re maximising your restorative R.E.M sleep.

Mimicking your usual nightly home routine will also help you drift off to sleep easier. Ear plugs, eye mask, whatever your thing is, make sure you’re consistent.

Also, either go to sleep at the local time for your destination or in accordance to your usual routine at home. Flitting between the two and sleeping when you want will only prolong your adjustment period. Civil Air Patrol cadet, Jim Gordon suggests that you should try and stick to your usual routine, even when you’re in a different time zone – however, that is probably easier said than done.

 

  1. Melatonin capsules

As pilots aren’t allowed to take sleeping tablets, some professionals opt for prescription melatonin capsules. The capsules imitate the sleep inducing hormone melatonin which helps to reset the sleep cycle. Captain, Kathy McCullough, said ‘It kind of just quiets the thoughts in your head long enough so that you can go to sleep, but it’s not a sleeping pill, so it won’t knock you out.’

 

  1. Pack your vitamins

Patrick Biedenkapp, a pilot from Berlin, advises others to pack turmeric water, spirulina and vitamin D tablets in winter to compensate for the lack of sun. Vitamin D regulates the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body, all essential nutrients to keeping bones, teeth and muscles healthy. Don’t fancy the tablets? Tuna, red meat, liver and egg yolks are also rich in vitamin D.

 

  1. West is best…

So they say anyway. While aviation professionals can’t avoid travelling west, the experts advise that if you are, stay up late on the days leading up to your trip and get as much sunlight exposure as you can during the flight.

 

  1. & East is a beast

If you’re heading east, reverse the cycle – get up as early as you can on the days leading up to your trip and avoid sunlight on the day of your trip to advance your internal clock (so don’t forget your sunglasses!) When you arrive, adjust to your new time zone by sleeping with the curtains open for the first few nights.

‘East is a beast’ was coined by airline professionals and passengers who claim that traveling east is much more challenging. Captain, Lisa Mrozek, says ‘If you’re flying against the sun, it’s a lot harder on your body. If you’re going west, it just seems easier, that’s the general gist.”

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities...

5 packing hacks by GATE8 Luggage

At GATE8, as the cabin luggage brand of choice for many frequent travellers, they are constantly talking to business travellers, pilots and crew about how travel could be made more efficient. Especially when it comes to packing, they’ve accumulated a wealth of hacks...