What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

As part of the airline cabin crew assessment day, you may be asked to perform a series of tests, writes Patricia Green.

I am often asked on the forum what are involved in these, so thought it would be helpful to cover them in more detail here! They are not there to be difficult or to trick you but to see if you have the basic knowledge skills that a cabin crew member needs.

Tests do differ from airline to airline and the questions here are examples taken from different airlines over the last year. There are also a few simple tips I can give you – it is all in the preparation! If it’s your dream to become a member of cabin crew, you’ll want to take a look at this:

 

What does the cabin crew assessment day consist of?

Cabin crew assessment days are held when airlines are recruiting for individuals to work for them – more specifically (as you’ve probably guessed), cabin crew members. Assessment days with airlines are never easy, and the day is split into different, smaller assessments where you’ll need to shine. The below outlines the types of tests you’ll face on your assessment day. 

 

The reach test

Firstly, there is the ‘reach test’ this is the first and most important, as it is as simple as passing the test or failing the whole assessment day. You must be able to reach to 210 cm for most airlines. This is without shoes, and you will be allowed on tip toes with either one or both hands, and fingertips reaching to the marker.

You do need to be able to do this as you have to be able to reach the safety equipment onboard the aircraft in the overhead lockers. Do mark a point on the wall and practice reaching it every day – it is surprising how many people miss this opportunity by not realising how important it is! Some airlines in Asia, in particular, have a slightly lower reach test, as do some of the regional airlines, depending on aircraft type, so these are worth considering if you cannot reach the marker.

 

 

Mathematics test

The maths test always worries everyone, but you don’t have to be a star maths pupil to survive it, just think practically. It will involve using basic maths in a cabin crew situation – so for example:

• A meal cart fits 6 trays horizontally and 12 trays vertically, how many trays are there in the cart?
• A passenger buys 2 coffees at 2.99 GBP and gives you 10.00 GBP, what change do you give?

Also, consider currency exchange (they will give you the rate…and you may get a calculator) so with the last question:

• What if they gave you 10 euros? What change would you give? The rate is 1.10.

Basically, if you have passed your maths GCSE or equivalent as the requirements ask, then you will be fine!

 

 

Language test

The English test used by some of the airlines in the Middle East is about an hour long. It does change and subjects will differ, but just as an idea of what to expect:

You’ll be asked to read a cabin crew story – you must then answer 5 multiple choice questions about the story to check your understanding.

  • Match the task to text – this checks that you understand the meaning of words e.g. reliable, considered etc. and phrases such as ‘take it or leave it’ for example.
  • Read a cover letter – answer 5 multiple choice questions about it
    Essay – write about a specified subject. ‘Who is your inspiration and why?’, or ‘If I ruled a country, which country would I rule and why?’ or ‘What traits do you like or not like about yourself? How and why would you change them?’

 

If you are worried about your English skills, there are books and courses online that specialise in English for Cabin Crew, so it may be worth perfecting your fluency. The current standard for cabin crew in Aviation English is ICAO level 4, but you do not need a special qualification.

Foreign language speakers may also be asked to complete a test in their alternate language to check fluency level, if they are being recruited for language skills. This is often an oral test with a recruiter who speaks your language.

 

 

General knowledge test

Of course, no two airline tests are the same, so you can just use this as a basic guide for the assessment day. There may also be a general knowledge test which includes things like geography, airport codes, currency or the 24 hour clock.

While you do not need to study any of these in detail, they will also be useful for your training once you get through. Do take a look also, at the airline’s route map (learn some airport codes…) and also research the aircraft fleet and the airline’s current product and history. This will really help you shine in your tests and show professional knowledge in the final interview stage.

 

Group test

The group exercise will help recruiters to establish whether you have the soft skills required to perform well as a member of cabin crew. Every day your role will require you to work in a group, so you should have a good understanding of how to work with various scenarios like being under time pressure, climate and other stress factors, communicating openly with people of diverse backgrounds and positions, listening to instructions or complaints and being able to problem solve quickly. 

You will face a complex task in a group of 8-12 people, all who will differ in personality (another complication you will have to deal with). This allows them to see how you will react to other personalities and approaches, therefore how you will react in a work environment. You will likely be assessed on the following competencies:

  • Growth mindset
  • Positivity
  • Teamwork
  • Time management
  • Active listening
  • Initiative
  • Motivation and enthusiasm
  • Creativity
  • Decision making
  • Cultural awareness

 

Avoid arguing, taking on tasks you weren’t delegated, talking over others and dominating the conversation, and not trusting others to help. 

 

Interview

In advance of your assessment day it’s important to review common cabin crew interview questions and how to answer them. This will be an important part of your assessment, so be sure you are fully prepared to impress. Speak clearly and calmly, and have a background knowledge of the airline to fall back on. Sit up straight and don’t slouch – show positive body language and posture. Avoid crossing your arms and legs, and remember to smile.

 

About the Author:

Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant.

She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit Cabin Crew Consultant.

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Airline Captain: Job Description

Airline Captain: Job Description

What does a Captain do?

 
An airline captain has overall responsibility for the safe and efficient operation of the aircraft and the safety of crew and passengers. They will be concerned with the airworthiness of the plane, weather factors affecting the flight, flight regulations, air traffic control procedures, and will be making use of air navigational aids designed to provide maximum safety in the air. These aviation professionals are among the most experienced, skilled and respected workers in the airline industry.
 
For a senior pilot role, you would need to clock up at least 5 years’ experience before promotion to captain. Once in this position, you can earn very a very attractive salary, with perks including travel passes and accommodation allowances.
 
Airline captain responsibilities might include:
  • Ensure all information on the route, weather, passengers and aircraft is received
  • Use this information to create flight plans
  • Keeping aircraft logbook up to date
  • Making regular checks on aircraft’s technical performance, pre-flight safety checks on navigation and operating systems
  • Directing all aspects of flight planning, documenting aircraft and operational compliance to company and government standards and regulations
  • Manage emergencies and coordinate with emergency support agencies
  • Liaising with and directing team interactions involving mechanics, ground crew, ATC and airport operations
  • Managing a large team including flight deck crew, cabin and ground crew coordination
  • Maintain proficiency throughout consistent training programmes
  • Multi-tasking, analysing information, prioritising problems, and achieving objectives during an ever changing, fast paced working environment
 
 

What qualifications do I need to become a Captain?

To become a captain, you must first train as pilot.
 
To work as a commercial pilot, you will need an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL). Training for this can take around two years and can cost as much as £100,000.
 
To get on to a pilot training course, you will need to have performed well at school. E.g. grades A*-C (9-4) and A-levels in at least English and Maths. Subjects including science or a second language would be a great advantage.
 
You must also be at least 21 years of age to apply for an ATPL, and you’ll need to pass a background security check. you will also need to have a Class 1 Medical Certificate.
 
It might also be useful to to take an aptitude test beforehand too, before embarking on years of expensive training. you can do this at The Honourable Company of Airline Pilots hold an aptitude test at RAF Cranwell and they use some tests used by the RAF in their selection process.

 

Working conditions

As a pilot, you will work in shifts. The role will be demanding, both physically and mentally, and you will likely experience jetlag effects from crossing different timezones, which you will eventually become accustomed to. You should also expect to spend alot of time away from home, due to the obvious travelling demands of your job. If you are working a standby pilot, you will also be expected to be based close to the airport.

 

Anything else?

Flight training schools will also want to make sure that you are suited to a career as a pilot before they invest so much training in you.
 
Most Approved Training Organisations (ATOs – for a full list, see the CAA website) will put you through their own testing to make sure that you have the right personality and skills to be a successful pilot. Over a series of written papers, interviews, group tests, and simulator tests, you will be expected to demonstrate skills such as problem solving, spatial awareness, and people skills.
 
You will also need to demonstrate your dedication to your chosen career with a good level of general knowledge about the aviation industry. You should treat this stage as seriously as you would treat any job interview and do as much research and preparation as you can.
 
 
 

How much does it cost to become a Pilot?

Training to become a pilot can cost as much as £100,000. This is a very important aspect of the career that you should consider. Make sure that you are aware of every penny that goes in to qualifying as a pilot before you pay a penny.

Some UK airlines have fully sponsored training programmes, such as British Airways’ Future Pilot Programme or the Virgin Atlantic Future Flyers Programme. Places on such schemes are limited and highly contested, but are fantastic opportunities if you manage to secure a spot.
 
 

What’s the career path for a Pilot?

Most airline pilots start out as a first officer, co-pilot or flight engineer with a regional carrier. All pilots will have progressed through a vigorous flight training programme and have earned a commercial pilot’s license or an airline transport rating. Most likely they will also have one or more advanced ratings such as instrument, multi-engine or aircraft type ratings depending on the requirements of their particular flying job.
 
Captain vacancies advertised today are often specified by the aircraft to be flown – B777 captain, B737 captain, A320 captain, A340 captain and so on. They sometimes work on short contracts, and may work unusual shift patterns, such as 6 weeks on, 2 weeks off. Captain jobs advertised often specify minimum requirements such as ‘5000 hours total flying time’ and ‘1500 hours PIC on commercial aircraft. Hiring airlines will also want to see accident and violation free records from applicants for pilot jobs.
 
According to aviation law, an airline pilot may not fly more than 85 hours a month or 1,000 hours a year. However, it’s likely that the average pilot works more than 100 hours a month, counting ground duties such as filing flight plans, working on reports, briefing crews and attending training classes. All pilots, including captains, are required to attend training and simulator checks once or twice a year.
 
 
 

How much could I earn as a Captain?

According to our latest annual survey, the average salary a pilot earned in 2018 was £58,964.69. This would obviously increase depending on experience etc.

 

Want to see what life could be like as a pilot? Watch this short video by Flightdeck to get a real insight:

 

 
To find out more about being a pilot, read our pilot guide or browse our airline captain jobs.
 
Photo: British Airways

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A warm welcome to our new Advertising Agency Sales Manager, Georgia Cox.

A warm welcome to our new Advertising Agency Sales Manager, Georgia Cox.

Here at Aviation Job Search HQ, we’re thrilled to announce we have recently appointed Georgia Cox to take on the position of Advertising Agency Sales Manager. Working closely with Dave Capper, Managing Director, she will be responsible for heading up the sales strategy for advertising agencies.

Georgia is joining us from Stepstone, home to generic job boards such as Total Jobs and Jobsite.co.uk, so we wanted to get her thoughts on the move to a niche job board, and give her a proper introduction.

How would you describe yourself?

“I’m a very passionate person, with a desire to achieve. My professionalism coupled with my ambition means I believe deeply in inspiring others. I find this achieves the best possible outcome for the organisation I work for, and I’m proud to do so.”

Tell us about your experience

“I have been in the industry for over 6 years and I love what I do. In the past, I’ve worked with brands such as McLaren, BMW, Lidl and Tesco and my main aim is to support them in finding the best candidates for their jobs. There’s nothing better to see an organisation grow to it’s full potential by hiring the right people.”

What are you most excited about within your new role?

“Aviation Job Search is dynamic and ambitious, which I think says a lot about a company. It’s really motivating to see a company that is constantly striving for the next big thing, which fits right in with my personal ambitions.

I want to make a positive impression as soon as I can, so I’m really excited to work with the agencies that are already on board as well as expanding the existing client base.”

Why did you decide to switch from working with a generic job boards to niche job boards?

“For me this is about the new challenge that’s presented itself. The prospect of working with a niche is exciting because the types of jobs that clients are posting are so skilled, and tough to fill at times, it makes for more interesting work!

With my experience, I’m confident I’ll have a positive impact and influence on both the performance of my clients businesses and Aviation Job Search.”

Looking to promote your client’s jobs on a quality platform that provides a cost effective return on investment? Call Georgia today on 07557309053

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What is Google For Jobs?

What is Google For Jobs?

The online recruiting landscape is changing and many jobseekers are turning to search engines to find their perfect role. Google wanted to provide a service that would make this search faster and more efficient, and so Google for Jobs (GFJ) was developed. So far, GFJ has been proven to generate an 18% increase in applications, as demonstrated when Johnson and Johnson piloted the feature. The success of GFJ will undoubtedly change the way people search for roles, but Aviation Job Search has the know-how to ensure that your job posts won’t be affected.

 

What is Google for Jobs and how will it work?

GFJ is Google’s new feature that will enable jobseekers to search for roles directly through the Google search engine. Users will be able to search for specific job roles, locations, salaries and companies based on their preferences. The tool will also draw salary ranges from career review websites which will provide a degree of financial transparency. For jobs that do not post their salaries, GFJ will display the typical salary for the role. This will give jobseekers the power to asses and negotiate their salaries and understand more about issues such as potential gender pay gaps. This is all part of GFJ’s aim to give jobseekers more power when job hunting.

The algorithm employed by GFJ is capable of interpreting, rather just collecting the data it pulls from job adverts and jobseekers’ search terms. This will result in Google grouping together roles that are the closest matches to a jobseeker’s preferences. So, if someone searches for a role that may have various titles in different companies, GFJ will recognise this and show these to the jobseeker.

When a jobseeker searches for a role, the results generated by GFJ will appear at the top of the page, above the organic results. This will make it more difficult for job posts that have appeared further down in the results, as it is unlikely that jobseekers will scroll to the bottom of the page to find them.

If a jobseeker then chooses to apply for a job, GFJ will direct them straight to the recruiter’s website, or, if the job is posted on a job board or agency, they will be directed to the job post on that site.

 

What impact will it have on job boards?

GFJ hopes to deliver more relevant search results than job sites can offer, encouraging jobseekers to search for roles directly through Google. It is believed that this will help to level the playing field as the results will come from the most relevant job posts, rather than the job sites that have the most traffic. This will also give smaller sites the opportunity for growth as it will give their posts the opportunity for more traffic if they are relevant to jobseekers.

As GFJ becomes more dominant in the recruitment arena, it is crucial that companies and job boards are prepared for the changes that will come as a result. Aviation Job Search has spent time ensuring that we fully understand the way GFJ works and what we need to do to guarantee that the results you get from us won’t be affected.

 

How can Aviation Job Board help you?

Our experts have an excellent understanding of harnessing the power of search engine optimisation (SEO), which means we can ensure that jobs are visible to jobseekers on the new GFJ tool and will appear before roles from other aviation sites. We also combat the issue of Google sending job alert emails, by sending our own targeted emails to our extensive list of jobseekers every day.

As we are a niche job board with over half a million registered jobseekers, many skilled aviation professionals already come directly to our site to find their next role. Our knowledge of SEO paired with our market-leader status holds us in good stead to continue helping recruiters and jobseekers find each other quickly and efficiently.

Make sure that you’re not affected by the changes GFJ will generate and post your roles with us. Your personal Account Manager will guide you through the process of getting your job posted on our site and our experts will ensure that your jobs are optimised for GFJ.

 

Get in touch

If you have any further questions or would like to post a job on our site, call us today.

Aviation Job Search is the world’s leading aviation job board. With over half a million jobseekers registered on our site and over 1,400 new CVs uploaded daily, we help hundreds of recruiters find their perfect applicant every day.

 

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Psychometric tests in aviation recruitment

Psychometric tests in aviation recruitment

What is a psychometric test?

Psychometric tests are increasingly being used in the recruitment process, especially by larger companies that need to screen lots of applicants for the same position. These tests are a quick way for an employer to gain an understanding of your personality, skills and intelligence. The tests you are assigned will depend on the role that you are applying for but will generally look at your ability to process different types of information and how you work with other people. These results can then help the recruiter decide whether or not you are the right fit for the role and the company. These kinds of tests have been around for more than a hundred years and as they have evolved into the more accurate psychometric tests used today, they have become a regular feature in recruitment processes. Employers, therefore, have the opportunity to assess candidates on their future potential rather than employment history or educational background. Psychometric tests are often used as one of the preliminary stages of the recruitment process and are often taken online or at an assessment centre.  

What to expect in a psychometric test

Employers tend to explore three main areas with psychometric tests: personality, aptitude, and skills. Therefore, you may be asked to complete several tests to give an idea of how you perform in each of these areas. The tests will usually take place online or at an assessment centre. Some employers still use paper tests so it’s worth finding out the format beforehand so you can familiarise yourself with it. The tests themselves usually come in a multiple-choice format. The tests that are designed to look at your skills and aptitude will normally have a time-limit attached. However, personality tests usually give you as much time as you need to relieve some of the pressure so you can answer honestly.  

Types of psychometric test

Aptitude tests:

  • Abstract reasoning: These are sometimes known as inductive reasoning tests or diagrammatic reasoning tests. These tests are designed to assess your logical reasoning and your ability to learn new things quickly. They do this by analysing your response to patterns, diagrams and charts. You will usually have to choose the next pattern in a series by identifying a set of rules. These sorts of tests are particularly common for technical roles, such as engineering.
  • Verbal reasoning: This kind of psychometric test looks at the way you process written information and communication. You will often be given a passage of text and a series of questions based on this information. Your answers will reveal your ability to analyse information and come to an informed conclusion or decision. Sometimes the test will also assess your standard of spelling and grammar, so be sure to be as accurate as possible.
  • Numerical psychometric tests: These tests can be used to assess how you deal with numerical data from a very basic level to much more advanced problems. You will often be given a series of graphs, statistics or reports and you’ll be asked questions based on these.
  • Logical reasoning: These are sometimes known as deductive reasoning tests. These evaluate your ability to reach a conclusion by presenting you with some information and assessing your response.
 

Skills tests:

These tests focus on your ability to carry out the role you are applying for more directly than the aptitude tests explored above. For example, you might be given a task which involves solving a mechanical fault if you were applying to be an engineer. If you were applying for a role as a member of cabin crew, you might be given a task to resolve an issue with a tricky passenger.  

Personality tests:

Personality psychometric tests are important in helping recruiters evaluate how you approach tasks and how you work with others. This will give them an indication as to whether you are suited to the role, the company and how likely you would be to stay in the role for an extended period. There are no right or wrong answers to these kinds of tests and you will have no way of knowing exactly what they are looking for, so it is important to be honest with your answers. Sometimes your results will be cross-referenced with those of employees already at the business to get an idea of how you would fit in. One of the most common personality tests is the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). This test consists of questions about a variety of scenarios and how you would respond to them. Your results will then assign you to one of 16 personality types.  

Psychometric test practice

There are several ways that you can prepare for psychometric testing and it is generally advised that you do some practice beforehand, even if you only do some basic questions.
  • Make sure you know what type of tests are coming up. This involves finding out whether you are going to be given aptitude tests, skills tests or personality tests. You will also want to find out the format the tests will take so you can practice either on-screen or paper versions of the test.
  • Find out if you will be negatively marked. Whether or not you will be penalised for incorrect answers should have an impact on your strategy. If you won’t be negatively marked, you should aim to answer as many questions within the time limit as you can. If you will be, you should be much more careful with questions you aren’t sure about. Sometimes it will be better to leave the answer blank.
  • Doing some practice tests is likely to improve your performance in the real thing. Here are some sites that offer some practice tests:
 

Advantages and disadvantages of psychometric tests

Advantages:

  • The tests are objective, removing any element of human bias.
  • They can be a great benefit for those that don’t tend to perform well at interview as the test results will be able to help them stand out.
  • The tests have been proven to give a generally accurate prediction as to how a candidate will perform in a role.
 

Disadvantages:

  • On the other hand, if you are the type of person who gets nervous in the face of exams and tests, you may not perform as well as you could if the process only involved an interview.
  • The results, however accurate, can’t paint a complete picture of a candidate.
  • If you try and give the answers that you think the employer is looking for, the results will be inaccurate.

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