How to stay healthy in your new job as cabin crew

How to stay healthy in your new job as cabin crew

Congratulations – welcome to a life of travel and excitement. When you interviewed for your cabin crew job you had to demonstrate great customer service skills and the ability to work well in a team. One of the other factors you were recruited for was your health. In your new job, this is an important asset. Let’s take a look at some of the things you can do to make sure you stay healthy to enjoy all that your new career has to offer.

 

Creating good habits around your flying lifestyle will help you settle in well from the beginning. The best way to go about creating habits is to swap out old habits for new ones or attach a new habit to something you already do. Think of these new health habits as additions to the safety drills you learn in training school, and keep them simple to start with.

 

Be a sipper not a guzzler

Staying hydrated is important for your functional health and for your ability to perform in your role. You will be working at altitude where the air is dry compared to the ground, so make a conscious habit to drink plenty of water on the plane, whenever you are away. The trick is to be a sipper, not a guzzler. Overloading your bladder and taking multiple trips to the restroom is something you want to avoid. Packing your own water bottle with you at all times can be very useful. Some crew get bored drinking so much water and choose to make it interesting by adding flavour with a non-sugar based or natural no-calorie sweetener. Minimising salty foods and excessive tea and coffee will also help. Did you know constipation is one of the most common complaints of flying? Staying hydrated also helps you avoid constipation.

 

Become a napper

Prioritise sleep. When you’re travelling the globe and enjoying yourself, it is easy to get carried away and skimp on good rest and recuperation. Savvy crew do better by making sleep sacred. In your role, awareness and vigilance are vital for safety. You can only be fully attentive if you are well rested. Changing time zones and being on the go can take getting used to – the excitement can leave you spent. You will in effect become a shift worker, and should look after your sleep like one. Add naps into your routines and practice good sleep hygiene. This means sleeping in total darkness without any light disturbance (use eye masks if you have to), making sure the room temperature is right for you, and that disturbances are minimised. The most important thing to remember is your lifestyle will regularly expose you to disrupted sleep, so it is your job to always look for opportunities to redress the balance. Becoming skilled at napping whenever there is opportunity helps.

 

Exercise is not optional

Exercise, exercise, exercise. Become one of the beautiful people – leave vitality in your wake! Travel is hard on your body’s physiology and you need to be prepared by building resilience. Staying fit on the road and at home is a good way to combat the stress of travel and adapt better to the time zone changes. If possible, making sure you have a healthy dose of aerobic exercise daily is the way to go. As a habit, it will give your body an oxygen advantage when you step on the plane, because oxygen at altitude is thinner in the pressurised cabin. You will be better altitude adapted than non-exercisers.

 

Stay emotionally healthy

Mental health challenges are an issue that continues to crop up in the workplace today, and your new job as cabin crew does not exempt you from taking positive action to make sure you stay emotionally healthy. Time away from loved ones or stressful situations you have no control over because you are away can take their toll. Proactively building good relationships to support you and the people you care about is important. Make sure you check-in with family, friends and confidants regularly. This way you will always have a sounding board when you need it. Famously, galley chats with fellow crew in the middle of the night can be quite therapeutic. As the saying goes a problem shared is a problem halved.

 

Become a global citizen

Taking a healthy interest in world affairs is a good habit to cultivate because having an awareness of where you are travelling to helps you and others stay safe by being informed. Some airlines have teams of people doing this on behalf of all the crew, who then receive an update briefing of what they must know. If you don’t have that provided to you, paying attention to a good news source or the Foreign Office travel brief may be helpful.

To make this advice work seamlessly, put these tips in a system and make it an enjoyable practice. For instance, making it a habit to see a city by bike wherever possible can double-up as exercise as well as a sight-seeing tour, getting into the habit of having a nap before you report for duty can give you that extra energy boost to help see you through a long duty day.

Your health is worthy of investment to make sure you get the most enjoyment out of the job, invest in it over time and it will support you in having some of the best times of your flying lifestyle, enjoy.

Got a question about this blog? Visit the No Jet Stress Facebook page today for more information! 

 

About Christopher

Christopher Babayode is a former flight attendant of 20 years with Briitish Airways, a specialist in Travel Wellness and healthy jet lag solutions for those who travel often. He is the author of Farewell Jet Lag, Cures from a Flight Attendant (on Amazon UK & US). Chris has been featured in the Sunday Telegraph and is a most -read author on Quora the questions and answers platform.

Christopher will also be guest speaking at our event later on this year, at the Aviation Job Expo

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Step three…how do I target my CV to specific airlines?

Step three…how do I target my CV to specific airlines?

Following on from our article from last month Step Two…how do I find the right airline for me? we look this month at the all important Cabin Crew CV, and more specifically how to ‘target’ your CV to the airline you’re applying for.

As a first step, I would advise taking a look at the requirements for the airline or airlines that you’re thinking of applying to.  We have our own range of airline guides at Cabin Crew Wings, and you can browse through them here.

Then dig out your CV and we’ll take a look at how you can tailor it using the ‘identity’ of the airline!  But first, let’s take a look at a couple of important CV points…

 

Your CV

 

Personal Details

This part is overlooked so often in the CVs we are sent in as part of our CV Review Service! I can’t emphasise enough how important it is that your personal details are correct and up to date.

Occasionally the recruitment team might need to contact you to confirm a detail and only have the contact number on your CV in front of them – so imagine how you’d feel if you missed an important call due to not updating your number!

 

Spelling and Grammar

Your CV will often be the first impression the recruitment team get of you, and bad spelling and grammar is not only unprofessional, but also considered unacceptable in this day and age where access to various spelling and grammar checking apps and software is readily available. There’s no bigger turn off for the recruitment team than this – don’t let yourself down here!

 

Targeting your CV

Basically you would ideally start off with a CV which highlights all of the standard cabin crew requirements that you fulfil, and your past life and employment experiences can then be tailored each time you apply to a different airline.

It may seem like a lot of work – essentially you’re rewriting your CV to some extent with each application.  But trust me, you’ll reap the benefits!

The ‘personal statement’ section of your CV is vitally important as this is the first part that the recruitment team will read, so this will undoubtedly be the part that needs the most updating for specific airlines as you selectively edit the most relevant information to put within it.

 

Airline Research

Do your homework!  As I’ve mentioned, look at the requirements for each airline – although many of these are the same across the board, such as having high standards of personal grooming, a positive attitude and customer service skills there are certain traits more desirable to some airlines than to others.

For example, low cost carriers such as Ryanair and Easyjet place a lot of emphasis on onboard sales, so if you have any experience in a sales setting make sure to highlight this!  On the other hand the more luxurious airlines like Emirates or Etihad hold excellent customer service skills in the highest regard – if you have customer service experience or can relate a time where you’ve been recognised for going above and beyond your duties in this area then don’t hold back, put it down!

 

Airline Identity

In addition to their requirements each airline will have their own ‘brand’ or ‘identity’.  You can get a feel for this by reading blog posts and news articles on the airline – either on the official blog on their website or through blog posts written by the crew who work for them, which give fascinating ‘behind the scenes’ titbits and advice.

Look at the airline’s mission statement too, this will give you insight into their core values. For example, some airlines make a huge commitment to sustainability and the environment – if this is something that you feel strongly about too then make sure they know this.  

You can tailor your personal information with relevant facts about yourself that highlight any experiences (not just in employment – perhaps in your personal life doing things such as volunteering, charity work or hobbies) in this area.

 

If you think your CV is up to scratch, then that’s great! But if you feel like it might be able to use a little tweaking and you’re not sure what to do, have you thought about having an expert check it over?

Next month, we’ll look at the online application process for airlines, and what you can expect to happen during this process:

Step Four – Applying Online

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How can I make my engineering CV stand out?

Is your dream job to become an engineer in the aviation industry? Then you’ll need a job winning CV that stands out from the rest of the competition.

Impressing recruiters with your CV is the first big step to getting your foot in the door with a company, so before you begin your job search, writing your CV should be a priority. Although you might be super talented with your hands, sitting down to write out your CV may be more of a challenge than you think. With this in mind, we’ve put together some top tips to help you get started with your engineering CV, so you can top the list of those invited for an interview.

 

The basics

Contact details: This seems like a simple tip, but there is nothing more frustrating for a recruiter than to see a CV that delivers in terms of experience and skillset, only to fail to contact the person due to outdated or incorrect contact details. Triple check that you’ve left the right details with no typos, as this could be detrimental to your whole application – don’t risk finding your dream job because you forget to check.

Professional summary: This section is the first and most important selling point of your CV. Sitting in the top quarter of your CV, your professional summary consists of a few sentences which explain who you are and why you are write for the job you are applying for. In this section, you may wish to showcase your years of experience, key skills you have to do the job in question, qualities that will fit with the role, and potentially your career ambitions.

Consider this section carefully. Recruiters receive alot of CVs for jobs, so it’s very likely they’ll be skimming each one to find the most relevant details. By including your key experience and selling points in this section, you are giving them the information they crave right at the beginning of your CV – which is great for them, because they haven’t had to work hard to find it.

For example, a professional summary for an engineer’s CV in the aviation industry might look something like this: “Expert aircraft maintenance engineer with over 7 years’ experience. Highly skilled in risk management, cost control, resource utilisation and general project operations. In-depth technical knowledge and manual dexterity. Task oriented and organised, I strive for success. Adept at identifying complex problems and ideal, realistic solutions for aircraft. Excellent communicator who works well with others. Committed to ensuring aircraft safety and optimal level of operation. Looking for a role that will challenge my skills and put me on the path towards senior management.”

Skills: Too many people fail to include this section, because they feel it will be covered across the ‘Experience’ section. But the key to including your skills separately is that you’re making it easy for a recruiter to see them, and therefore saving them time to see if you fit the bill. Make your skills stand out with this section, and be sure to tailor which skills fit each job application most.

For example, an aircraft engineer’s skills section might look something like this:

  • Leadership
  • Problem solving
  • Strong oral and written communication 
  • Design optimisation
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Structural and thermal analysis
  • Risk management
  • AC/DC theory
  • Teamwork

 

Qualifications:

Qualifications will be essential for your CV. With such an important job at hand, recruiters need to be sure that you are more than qualified for the job they’re hiring for. So if you can’t provide evidence of the relevant qualifications, they could skip past your CV. Qualifications you might find on the CV of an engineer include:

  • Mechanical (Design) Engineering 2:1
  • CAD
  • Project Management Professional
  • Training: Advanced Project Management, Risk Management
  • MS Office Suite
  • Java

 

Experience: 

Your experience section will be the door to your career so far. Here, you will show that you have the relevant experience that leads up to this next job. Try to avoid using full sentences (if you do, keep them short). Bullet points seem to work best – and don’t be tempted to include every task you were responsible for at work. Just the important bits that highlight your capability to do the job you applied for.

Education:

For some engineering roles, you will be required to have a specific degree for the job e,g, mechanical engineering, or aeronautical engineering. Be sure to include any education you’ve received in the relevant areas – this will strengthen your application, as recruiters will have a clear understanding of your background knowledge. In some ways, it also helps to reaffirm the idea that you are working your way along your chosen career path, an admirable trait many companies value. 

For example:

Key responsibilities:

  • Working as part of an engineering team to develop mechanical design solutions for electronic cabinets used in naval applications
  • Using ANSYS finite element analysis tools
  • Utilising design optimisation tools to test weight reduction
  • Cost and technical proposals
  • Designing equipment for naval applications, including inboard and outboard electronics undersea hull array, towed array, or acoustic sensor programs
  • Creating new designs and modifying existing designs
  • Working with mechanical engineers as well as representatives from manufacturing, quality, drafting and other engineering disciplines

 

Hobbies and interests:

Hobbies and interests are more important than most people think for your CV. In some ways, this can help recruiters to identify whether you would be the right fit to their company culture. Most organisations want someone sociable and confident, so if you have hobbies that you think will highlight this, make sure you include them.

For example:

“Avid footballer, captaining my national league team for over 5 years.”

 

Check out this example below for a B2 engineer!

 

Tips that catch a recruiter’s eye

While the above is important, there are some key formatting tips you can use that might just give you the visual edge over other CVs too. Through strategic placement and simple formatting, your CV could have a much greater effect on a recruiter over the others. 

Top quarter: As previously discussed, the top quarter of your CV is essential, because it includes the shortest and hopefully the sweetest section – your professional summary. It’s essential that this summary screams ‘I’m perfect for this job!’because it’s likely the part recruiters will read in detail before they decide to move on from your CV, or pop it in the ‘interview’ pile. Pack this section with keywords that match the job application to show that you are the right fit for the job. In the top right hand corner of your CV, you should also include your name and accompanying professional title, which lets recruiters know instantly what job you are pursuing. Your contact details can be placed underneath this too. 

Length: Your CV should be no more than two pages long. Any more, and recruiter’s may feel that you haven’t been as succinct as you could be. Giving a recruiter more to read because you wish to leave no stone unturned isn’t wise. Give them less information, with more effect, if you really want your CV to make an impact.

Format: A tip that’s often overlooked by many, formatting your CV so it’s easy to read makes it much more attractive to the eye. We’re not just talking layout here – font type and size are also important. Have a play around, and print your CV out to see how friendly it is to they eye, Fonts like Comic Sans are seen to be slightly informal for a CV, but the likes of Quicksand are easy on the eye, and size 10 – 12 is easy to read. Using smaller, less complex sentences also makes your CV easier to read, and breaking up the text as much as possible means it’s simple to follow.

Avoid including images – recruiters don’t need to see this. Just written evidence of how suitable you are for the job. 

 

Other tips to help

Proofread: This is one of the biggest tips we can give you. Submitting a CV filled with typos or inaccurate information could sacrifice your CV. Always proofread your CV, and ask someone else to proofread it for you too.  

All set? Then you’re ready to start your application for the job you want! Oh, and don’t forget to download our ready made Engineer’s CV guide below – it includes tips and advice for your CV relevant to your job. Simply click below download it now!

Best of luck with your job search!

 

How can I make my engineering CV stand out?

Is your dream job to become an engineer in the aviation industry? Then you'll need a job winning CV that stands out from the rest of the competition.Impressing recruiters with your CV is the first big step to getting your foot in the door with a company,...

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Essential soft skills for aviation leadership

Essential soft skills for aviation leadership

As the passenger experience becomes more central to the aviation industry, possessing the right soft skills is critical for leaders – and aspiring leaders.

According to a study by ServiceElements published in Aviation Pros, 90% of those working in aviation surveyed said the problems they face involve interpersonal issues and communications disconnects in the workplace.

So, while technical proficiency and other qualifications is essential, soft skills are also required for success.

Here are three essential soft skills if you’re looking to lead.

 

Communication

Communication is essential in any industry, but it’s especially critical in aviation, according to Florida Tech graduate Jason Terreri, Executive Director at Syracuse Regional Airport Authority.

“It can be a challenge getting the message across to people outside of the airport industry so that they see both the opportunities you’re bringing forward and the reality that sometimes in an airport, you have to do things a little bit differently than you would in other businesses or industries.”

Whether you’re dealing with people on your team or outside of the industry, it’s essential that aviation leaders are able to effectively communicate with others.

“You have to be able to articulate why you have to do things a certain way. That’s a challenge, especially when you’re dealing with different cultures and different languages,” says Terreri.

Steve Brechter told the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) that “astute communication” is one of the four critical attributes of a good aviation director.

Brechter, who is a senior advisor at Gray Stone Advisors, echoed Terreri in saying that aviation leaders must be able to communicate without using technical aviation terms in a concise and clear manner.

“The language of aviation needs to be secondary to the language of business,” said Brechter.

 

Adaptability

Being able to adapt to different situations is also a part of being an effective aviation leader. According to Brechter, “An effective aviation director needs to be as comfortable in the halls of the company headquarters as they are walking across the hangar.”

Chris Fernando, a Florida Tech grad and Senior Associate at Booz Allen Hamilton, says that “adaptability and flexibility are really important,” is essential for those who want to advance in the industry.

 

Listening

Aviation leaders who listen put themselves in a position of greater collaboration with their team, according to John Tiliacos, Florida Tech grad and Executive Vice President of Operations and Customer Service at Tampa International Airport.

“I think it’s important as a leader in the organization to surround myself with capable, strong people,” he said. “And if you put together a good, solid team, you’ll be successful.”

Good listeners also provide opportunities for constructive criticism and feedback, writes Neville Hay in International Airport Review:

“A great quality in a leader is the ability to listen to others and not be afraid to change one’s mind or acknowledge the superiority of another’s.”

 

Aviation Leadership: A Combination of Hard and Soft Skills

Being a superior aviation leader requires a combination of technical aviation skills and soft, business skills, according to Mike Nichols, NBAA’s VP of Operational Excellence and Professional Development.

“An effective aviation director must have these business-related skills in order to effectively work with headquarters, but he or she also must maintain technical skills in order to maintain safety in the organization and credibility with the flight department staff.”

To develop both of these skillsets, the NBAA suggests finding a degree program that combines aviation management and business fundamentals. Florida Tech’s BA in Aviation Management prepares future leaders for success in the industry with a curriculum that incorporates courses specific to the aviation industry as well as a liberal arts foundation, providing graduates with the technical and soft skills they need to succeed.

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Networking is a big part of the aviation world; look at any event in the aviation calendar and you will see that a big part of it will revolve around networking. You’ve heard the saying, ‘It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.’ This is often the case in business...

How can I make my engineering CV stand out?

Is your dream job to become an engineer in the aviation industry? Then you'll need a job winning CV that stands out from the rest of the competition.Impressing recruiters with your CV is the first big step to getting your foot in the door with a company,...

Essential soft skills for aviation leadership

As the passenger experience becomes more central to the aviation industry, possessing the right soft skills is critical for leaders – and aspiring leaders. According to a study by ServiceElements published in Aviation Pros, 90% of those working in aviation...

Aviation Job Search shortlisted for Best Job Board

Aviation Job Search shortlisted for Best Job Board

Aviation Job Search is pleased to announce that it has been shortlisted for Best Job Board at the 2019 Global Recruiter Industry Awards.

 

The Global Recruiter Industry Awards celebrates the achievements made over the last year by organisations within the recruitment industry, and by wider users of recruitment services. They mark out best practice and the most exciting players in the sector today.

 

This year, there were a record number of entries and judges have chosen their finalists though a very high calibre of candidates for each category, and Aviation Job Search has been included in this shortlist.

 

Aviation Job Search has been running for 20 years as a niche aviation job board, connecting airlines and other aviation organisations with top talent.

 

News of the nomination was well received by Aviation Job Search’s CEO, Ian Partington:

 

“We’re very pleased with this nomination. Being in the industry for two decades, this confirms that we’re moving in the right direction, giving jobseekers visiting our site the best possible experience while they search for jobs.

 

“We’ve placed a great focus on being more candidate driven over the last couple of years, making a number of changes to the website based on feedback from our jobseeker database, and incorporating some of the latest automation trends. So it’s great to see that we’re being recognised for our efforts worldwide.”

 

The 2019 Global Recruiter UK Industry Awards will take place on 20th June at the Cafe de Paris in central London.

Aviation Job Search shortlisted for Best Job Board

Aviation Job Search is pleased to announce that it has been shortlisted for Best Job Board at the 2019 Global Recruiter Industry Awards. The Global Recruiter Industry Awards celebrates the achievements made over the last year by organisations within the...