Commercial Pilot: Salary Guide

Commercial Pilot: Salary Guide

Have you ever wondered ‘how much do pilots earn?’. The starting salary for a newly qualified commercial pilot working for a small operation may be around £22,000 and could rise to well over £100,000 for an experienced long-haul captain. The training procedure to become a pilot can be very expensive, sometimes as much as £100,000. However, it could result in a very lucrative career; airline pilot was the 6th highest paid full-time profession in the UK according to the 2018 ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings.

Read on to discover how much a pilot could earn with different airlines, flying different types of aircraft.

Salaries at a glance

Short Haul Pilot Salary:

First Officer: £35,000 – £60,000

Captain: £60,000 – £100,000

Long Haul Pilot Salary:

First Officer: £45,000 – £120,000

Captain: £80,000 – £170,000

How much do pilots earn?

This greatly depends on the airline, the level of experience gained by the individual and the type of aircraft flown. Salaries will vary, but tend to increase with each year of service with a company, according to BALPA. So newly qualified pilots will likely be paid a low wage initially, which will increase as experience and years of employment increase.

The starting salary for a newly qualified first officer working for a small operation may be around £22,000 (or $35,000).

Starting salaries for those in larger companies are higher at around £24,000 pa to £28,000 pa ($38,000 to $45,000).

Salaries for more experienced commercial pilots could range from £28,000 ($45,000) to £60,000 ($75,000) in a first officer role. The starting salary for a captain with a medium-sized airline may range from £54,000 ($87,000) to £75,000 ($120,000), while those with the major operators could earn from £97,000 ($156,000) to over £140,000 ($225,000).

British Airways is one of the best airlines to fly for in terms of average salaries. Our calculations suggest that a long-haul pilot with plenty of experience could well reach the £150,000 mark. Even some low-cost airlines like Ryanair can pay their senior captains up to £100,000.

 

 

What is the average salary of a commercial pilot?

Industry estimates suggest that UK pilots can earn between £22,000 – £170,000 per year, depending on experience, airline and type of aircraft.

The following average salaries are based on the pilot jobs listed on Aviation Job Search in 2019.

 

Average pilot salary: £71,962.86

Average salary for captain: £81,493.54

Average salary for senior first officer: £72,270

Average salary for first officer: £58,409.96

(updated December 2019)

 

Small & medium twin-engine turboprop aircraft:

For example: Flybe, CityJet & Eastern Airways

First Officer: £22,000 – £40,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £3,000 flight duty pay)

Captain: £50,000 – £70,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £3,000 flight duty pay)

 

Executive Jet aircraft:

For example: NetJets, TAG Aviation, Ocean Sky

First Officer: £28,000 – £50,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £6,000 flight duty pay)

Captain: £50,000 – £95,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £7,000 flight duty pay)

 

Small & Medium – Short Haul Jet aircraft:

For example: Airbus 319 / 320 / 321, Boeing 737, 757 and Embraer 190/195. Examples of airlines include Air Southwest, British Airways Short Haul, CityJet, easyJet, Fly Dubai, Jet2, Norwegian Air Shuttle, Ryanair and Wizz Air

First Officer: £35,000 – £60,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £8,000 flight duty pay)

Captain: £60,000 – £100,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £9,000 flight duty pay)

 

Large – Long Haul Jet aircraft:

For example: Airbus 330, 340, 380, Boeing 747, 767, 777, 787. Airline examples might include Air France, American Airlines, British Airways Long Haul, Cathay Pacific, Delta, Emirates, Iberia, KLM, Lufthansa, Qantas, Qatar Airways, Turkish Airlines and Virgin Atlantic 

First Officer: £45,000 – £120,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £8,000 flight duty pay)

Captain: £80,000 – £170,000 basic pay (£2,000 – £13,000 flight duty pay)

(Figures from www.tobeapilot.co.uk)

 

Other benefits:

Flight duty pay

Flight duty pay is additional pay that can affect monthly take-home, although not all airlines use this system. It varies from company to company but essentially Flight Duty Pay is an element of pay based on a pilot being at work, in addition to basic salary. Often this is taxed at a different rate to the main salary. Flight Duty Pay can be a flat rate per sector or an hourly rate and can be based on duty time or flight time.

 

Incremental pay and benefits

It’s worth remembering that a pilot’s salary is often incremental, rising with each year of service within the company. And benefits and rewards should be taken into account too, including signing bonuses, health insurance, life insurance, dental insurance, vision insurance and a retirement plan. You’ll also get a pension scheme, various allowances, health cover and discounted travel.

Other benefits include paid vacation time, sick days, holidays, food expenses, and you also get to benefit from your schedule. Because a pilot can only fly 1,000 hours per year, you get as much as two weeks off every month, so you have more leisure time. You also get free airfare via jumpseats, plus the benefit of staying in wonderful locations in between work.

 

Working hours

In the role of pilot, unusual working hours should be expected. The length of a working day varies depending on the company and route but can range from three to twelve hours. The start times of a day will often differ depending on the route, sometimes beginning in the early morning and sometimes late at night.

 

 

Becoming an airline pilot

Becoming a successful pilot requires a lot of work and dedication, with pilots required to undergo extensive training to qualify, and pass certain tests every six months. The realistic financial commitments to become a pilot must be taken in to consideration too. As well as studying for these tests, commercial pilots must pass a medical examination every year.

According to the British Airline Pilots Association, a typical ATPL (Airline Transport Pilot’s Licence) course will cost approximately £60,000 which usually does not include the price of accommodation and living expenses. “The course lasts for about 18 months and is extremely intensive, requiring a huge amount of effort and willpower to complete,” says the BALPA. However, many airlines require more than an ATPL before they will let you apply for a job. Quite often pilots find themselves having to train for additional “type ratings” which qualifies them to fly a particular type of airliner, and this course can cost around £25,000. To find out more about the training involved, read our article on how to become a pilot in the UK.

Browse our commercial pilot jobs today.

Get the salary guide

Download the 2019 Aviation Salary Report here

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Revalidate your pilot license for free

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Cabin Crew: Salary Guide

Cabin Crew: Salary Guide

The subject of salary for cabin crew is often shrouded in mystery, largely due to the fact that current members of crew are advised by their airline not to discuss their salaries online. So the subject remains distinctly vague.

However, we can estimate from previous crew members at different airlines in the UK and Middle East, figures for typical salaries in 2019. In this article we will also be looking at other factors that might contribute to a cabin crew professional’s monthly pay, such as benefits and contracts. All of these will vary for each airline and country.

 

Basic salary

On average per year, cabin crew salaries start from £12,000, 12,000 Euro and $15,000.

This figure is taken across a range of scheduled/charter airlines. Although, in this difficult financial climate I have heard of cabin crew working for less than 450 Euro a month!

After a minimum of 1 year flying, you could benefit from a promotion to a cabin crew manager, wherein you should see a salary increase.

 

Cabin crew average salary

Starting salary: £12,000 – £14,000*

Experienced: £15,000 – £21,000*

Senior: £30,000*

*Figures based on 2019 Aviation Job Search data

 

Average salary (per airline)

Below, we have gathered the average salary for different airlines to give you an idea of how they vary ad what you could end up earning with them. These figures are provided via responses on Glassdoor:

  • Jet2.com: £18,000 per year
  • Ryanair: £14,000 per year
  • British Airways: £18,000 per year
  • EasyJet: £14,502 per year
  • TUI: £15,000 per year
  • Virgin Atlantic:  £15,000 per year
  • Air France: £17,000 – £18,000 per year

 

Flight pay

Flight pay is an hourly rate for hours from take off to landing. This is a small figure based on actual hours flown onboard – not all airlines have this, so check when you are applying for cabin crew jobs.

 

Allowance payments

There is also allowance payment for nights spent away from base (may differ from country to country visited, for example a meal in Tokyo will cost more than in Mombasa, therefore payments will reflect this.) Again, not all airlines pay for allowances and some have a set figure, for example 25 Euro per night away.

 

Language payments

Some airlines will pay a small monthly allowance for language speakers. If you speak a language fluently and can do the public announcements etc onboard regular flights, you may get paid a little extra, but you may find you will also be working the same routes regularly!

 

Commission from duty free sales onboard

This may be between 5-10% of total sales on board shared by the whole crew – every little bit helps! It is also worth knowing that during your flight crew training course, you will only be receiving a basic salary – so for a usual 4-6 week period, you will be on a limited budget! This is normally received a month behind at the end of the month and allowances and extras are usually paid two months behind. The longer you stay with a company is also of benefit, as you should receive a yearly increment /bonus of up to 5% plus a yearly rise after a qualifying period.

 

Contracts

Contracts may be offered on a temporary basis, say for six months. This can be to premeditate a lack of available crew at a scheduled airline or to prepare for a very busy summer season at a European charter airline. Not all benefits available to full time crew may be available to contract crew, for example, things like annual leave or discounted tickets.

Although six months may not seem long, it is great if you want to just try out working with a different airline or if you are not sure that the job is right for you. There may also be a chance that you may be kept on, during the slow season if crew are required and you may be called back for the next seasonal contract. For scheduled airlines, for example British Airways, Virgin, Qantas or Emirates, you will mostly be offered a permanent full time contract. This will have a six month trial period, where you may choose to leave the company if you decide it’s not for you or the airline may not renew the contract.

Part time contracts are only really available to full time cabin crew who have already been with the airline for a number of years and for things like maternity leave or extended sick leave.

 

Other benefits

Annual leave of between 14 and 30 days a year is usually available to you, for your holiday or those special occasions. Many airlines also offer personal or medical insurance in case you get taken ill or have an accident, but this kind of cover can vary company to company. Pension schemes are sometimes available and if you happen to be sick there is a limited period of sick leave where you will be just paid a basic salary. Most scheduled airlines and some charters also offer reduced price tickets or staff travel on standby (if there is a seat available last minute!) which can be helpful if you wish to commute or travel during your annual leave.

Some cabin crew may be lucky and also receive discounts on gym membership, restaurants and transportation. Down-route, you may get discounts on internet fees and food at your hotel and discounts at the duty free shop at the airport. As your uniform is so important to company image, the company will normally pay for you to have it dry cleaned and some have laundry facilities at base for you to drop off your uniform. Many of the airlines in the Middle East, for example Emirates, Etihad, Qatar and Gulf Air offer their cabin crew, free transport (by crew bus to and from airport) and free accommodation (shared apartments with up to 3 other crew members) which can be a huge advantage. They also offer a tax free salary, so is a good option if you have no ties and are willing to move to a new country. So, all in all – that gives you an idea of how a cabin crew salary adds up. Every airline has different salary structure so it is hard to give an accurate single figure here.

On a practical note, it is always a good idea to weigh up the pros and cons of the contract. Consider if you have housing and transport costs to pay for or existing bills at home to cover, as these should be factored in. If you are successful at your assessment day and are still in doubt as to your approximate monthly salary and contract offer then do not hesitate to contact the Human Resources department for clarification on this information.

 

About Patricia Green:

I have been cabin crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for six years and also a SCCM. For the last six years I have worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. This last year, I moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant, so that I could advise potential crew how to get their dream job and help experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying.

In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, I have written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com

 

See our cabin crew job description for more information on working as a cabin crew member.

See the latest cabin crew jobs from Aviation Job Search

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What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew assessment days?

As part of the airline cabin crew assessment day, you may be asked to perform a series of tests, writes Patricia Green.

I am often asked on the forum what are involved in these, so thought it would be helpful to cover them in more detail here! They are not there to be difficult or to trick you but to see if you have the basic knowledge skills that a cabin crew member needs.

Tests do differ from airline to airline and the questions here are examples taken from different airlines over the last year. There are also a few simple tips I can give you – it is all in the preparation! If it’s your dream to become a member of cabin crew, you’ll want to take a look at this:

 

What does the cabin crew assessment day consist of?

Cabin crew assessment days are held when airlines are recruiting for individuals to work for them – more specifically (as you’ve probably guessed), cabin crew members. Assessment days with airlines are never easy, and the day is split into different, smaller assessments where you’ll need to shine. The below outlines the types of tests you’ll face on your assessment day.

 

The reach test

Firstly, there is the ‘reach test’ this is the first and most important, as it is as simple as passing the test or failing the whole assessment day. You must be able to reach to 210 cm for most airlines. This is without shoes, and you will be allowed on tip toes with either one or both hands, and fingertips reaching to the marker.

You do need to be able to do this as you have to be able to reach the safety equipment onboard the aircraft in the overhead lockers. Do mark a point on the wall and practice reaching it every day – it is surprising how many people miss this opportunity by not realising how important it is! Some airlines in Asia, in particular, have a slightly lower reach test, as do some of the regional airlines, depending on aircraft type, so these are worth considering if you cannot reach the marker.

 

 

Mathematics test

The maths test always worries everyone, but you don’t have to be a star maths pupil to survive it, just think practically. It will involve using basic maths in a cabin crew situation – so for example:
• A meal cart fits 6 trays horizontally and 12 trays vertically, how many trays are there in the cart?
• A passenger buys 2 coffees at 2.99 GBP and gives you 10.00 GBP, what change do you give?

Also, consider currency exchange (they will give you the rate…and you may get a calculator) so with the last question:

• What if they gave you 10 euros? What change would you give? The rate is 1.10.

Basically, if you have passed your maths GCSE or equivalent as the requirements ask, then you will be fine!

 

 

Language test

The English test used by some of the airlines in the Middle East is about an hour long. It does change and subjects will differ, but just as an idea of what to expect:

You’ll be asked to read a cabin crew story – you must then answer 5 multiple choice questions about the story to check your understanding.

  • Match the task to text – this checks that you understand the meaning of words e.g. reliable, considered etc. and phrases such as ‘take it or leave it’ for example.
  • Read a cover letter – answer 5 multiple choice questions about it
    Essay – write about a specified subject. ‘Who is your inspiration and why?’, or ‘If I ruled a country, which country would I rule and why?’ or ‘What traits do you like or not like about yourself? How and why would you change them?’

 

If you are worried about your English skills, there are books and courses online that specialise in English for Cabin Crew, so it may be worth perfecting your fluency. The current standard for cabin crew in Aviation English is ICAO level 4, but you do not need a special qualification.

Foreign language speakers may also be asked to complete a test in their alternate language to check fluency level, if they are being recruited for language skills. This is often an oral test with a recruiter who speaks your language.

 

 

General knowledge test

Of course, no two airline tests are the same, so you can just use this as a basic guide for the assessment day. There may also be a general knowledge test which includes things like geography, airport codes, currency or the 24 hour clock.

While you do not need to study any of these in detail, they will also be useful for your training once you get through. Do take a look also, at the airline’s route map (learn some airport codes…) and also research the aircraft fleet and the airline’s current product and history. This will really help you shine in your tests and show professional knowledge in the final interview stage.

 

Group test

The group exercise will help recruiters to establish whether you have the soft skills required to perform well as a member of cabin crew. Every day your role will require you to work in a group, so you should have a good understanding of how to work with various scenarios like being under time pressure, climate and other stress factors, communicating openly with people of diverse backgrounds and positions, listening to instructions or complaints and being able to problem solve quickly.

You will face a complex task in a group of 8-12 people, all who will differ in personality (another complication you will have to deal with). This allows them to see how you will react to other personalities and approaches, therefore how you will react in a work environment. You will likely be assessed on the following competencies:

  • Growth mindset
  • Positivity
  • Teamwork
  • Time management
  • Active listening
  • Initiative
  • Motivation and enthusiasm
  • Creativity
  • Decision making
  • Cultural awareness

 

Avoid arguing, taking on tasks you weren’t delegated, talking over others and dominating the conversation, and not trusting others to help.

 

Interview

In advance of your assessment day it’s important to review common cabin crew interview questions and how to answer them. This will be an important part of your assessment, so be sure you are fully prepared to impress. Speak clearly and calmly, and have a background knowledge of the airline to fall back on. Sit up straight and don’t slouch – show positive body language and posture. Avoid crossing your arms and legs, and remember to smile.

 

About the Author:

Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant.

She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit Cabin Crew Consultant.

See the latest cabin crew jobs from Aviation Job Search

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Airline pilots made redundant can now revalidate their licenses for free with the help of our industry partner, Aviation Insider. Through a government grant (subject to conditions,) Aviation Insider will help pilots recover the cost of their simulator training. ...

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Airline Captain: Job Description

Airline Captain: Job Description

What does a Captain do?

An airline captain has overall responsibility for the safe and efficient operation of the aircraft and the safety of crew and passengers. They will be concerned with the airworthiness of the plane, weather factors affecting the flight, flight regulations, air traffic control procedures, and will be making use of air navigational aids designed to provide maximum safety in the air. These aviation professionals are among the most experienced, skilled and respected workers in the airline industry.
 
For a senior pilot role, you would need to clock up at least 5 years’ experience before promotion to captain. Once in this position, you can earn very a very attractive salary, with perks including travel passes and accommodation allowances.
Airline captain responsibilities might include:
  • Ensure all information on the route, weather, passengers and aircraft is received
  • Use this information to create flight plans
  • Keeping aircraft logbook up to date
  • Making regular checks on aircraft’s technical performance, pre-flight safety checks on navigation and operating systems
  • Directing all aspects of flight planning, documenting aircraft and operational compliance to company and government standards and regulations
  • Manage emergencies and coordinate with emergency support agencies
  • Liaising with and directing team interactions involving mechanics, ground crew, ATC and airport operations
  • Managing a large team including flight deck crew, cabin and ground crew coordination
  • Maintain proficiency throughout consistent training programmes
  • Multi-tasking, analysing information, prioritising problems, and achieving objectives during an ever changing, fast paced working environment

What qualifications do I need to become a Captain?

To become a captain, you must first train as pilot.
To work as a commercial pilot, you will need an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL). Training for this can take around two years and can cost as much as £100,000.
To get on to a pilot training course, you will need to have performed well at school. E.g. grades A*-C (9-4) and A-levels in at least English and Maths. Subjects including science or a second language would be a great advantage.
You must also be at least 21 years of age to apply for an ATPL, and you’ll need to pass a background security check. you will also need to have a Class 1 Medical Certificate.
It might also be useful to to take an aptitude test beforehand too, before embarking on years of expensive training. you can do this at The Honourable Company of Airline Pilots hold an aptitude test at RAF Cranwell and they use some tests used by the RAF in their selection process.

Working conditions

As a pilot, you will work in shifts. The role will be demanding, both physically and mentally, and you will likely experience jetlag effects from crossing different timezones, which you will eventually become accustomed to. You should also expect to spend alot of time away from home, due to the obvious travelling demands of your job. If you are working a standby pilot, you will also be expected to be based close to the airport.

 

Anything else?

Flight training schools will also want to make sure that you are suited to a career as a pilot before they invest so much training in you.
Most Approved Training Organisations (ATOs – for a full list, see the CAA website) will put you through their own testing to make sure that you have the right personality and skills to be a successful pilot. Over a series of written papers, interviews, group tests, and simulator tests, you will be expected to demonstrate skills such as problem solving, spatial awareness, and people skills.
You will also need to demonstrate your dedication to your chosen career with a good level of general knowledge about the aviation industry. You should treat this stage as seriously as you would treat any job interview and do as much research and preparation as you can.

How much does it cost to become a Pilot?

Training to become a pilot can cost as much as £100,000. This is a very important aspect of the career that you should consider. Make sure that you are aware of every penny that goes in to qualifying as a pilot before you pay a penny.

Some UK airlines have fully sponsored training programmes, such as British Airways’ Future Pilot Programme or the Virgin Atlantic Future Flyers Programme. Places on such schemes are limited and highly contested, but are fantastic opportunities if you manage to secure a spot.

What’s the career path for a Pilot?

Most airline pilots start out as a first officer, co-pilot or flight engineer with a regional carrier. All pilots will have progressed through a vigorous flight training programme and have earned a commercial pilot’s license or an airline transport rating. Most likely they will also have one or more advanced ratings such as instrument, multi-engine or aircraft type ratings depending on the requirements of their particular flying job.
 
Captain vacancies advertised today are often specified by the aircraft to be flown – B777 captain, B737 captain, A320 captain, A340 captain and so on. They sometimes work on short contracts, and may work unusual shift patterns, such as 6 weeks on, 2 weeks off. Captain jobs advertised often specify minimum requirements such as ‘5000 hours total flying time’ and ‘1500 hours PIC on commercial aircraft. Hiring airlines will also want to see accident and violation free records from applicants for pilot jobs.
 
According to aviation law, an airline pilot may not fly more than 85 hours a month or 1,000 hours a year. However, it’s likely that the average pilot works more than 100 hours a month, counting ground duties such as filing flight plans, working on reports, briefing crews and attending training classes. All pilots, including captains, are required to attend training and simulator checks once or twice a year.

How much could I earn as a Captain?

According to our latest annual survey, the average salary a pilot earned in 2018 was £58,964.69. This would obviously increase depending on experience etc.

 

Want to see what life could be like as a pilot? Watch this short video by Flightdeck to get a real insight:

 

To find out more about being a pilot, read our pilot guide or browse our airline captain jobs.
 
Photo: British Airways
Revalidate your pilot license for free

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Airline pilots made redundant can now revalidate their licenses for free with the help of our industry partner, Aviation Insider. Through a government grant (subject to conditions,) Aviation Insider will help pilots recover the cost of their simulator training. ...

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Step Fourteen – Managing relationships with colleagues

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A warm welcome to our new Advertising Agency Sales Manager, Georgia Cox.

A warm welcome to our new Advertising Agency Sales Manager, Georgia Cox.

Here at Aviation Job Search HQ, we’re thrilled to announce we have recently appointed Georgia Cox to take on the position of Advertising Agency Sales Manager. Working closely with Dave Capper, Managing Director, she will be responsible for heading up the sales strategy for advertising agencies.

Georgia is joining us from Stepstone, home to generic job boards such as Total Jobs and Jobsite.co.uk, so we wanted to get her thoughts on the move to a niche job board, and give her a proper introduction.

How would you describe yourself?

“I’m a very passionate person, with a desire to achieve. My professionalism coupled with my ambition means I believe deeply in inspiring others. I find this achieves the best possible outcome for the organisation I work for, and I’m proud to do so.”

Tell us about your experience

“I have been in the industry for over 6 years and I love what I do. In the past, I’ve worked with brands such as McLaren, BMW, Lidl and Tesco and my main aim is to support them in finding the best candidates for their jobs. There’s nothing better to see an organisation grow to it’s full potential by hiring the right people.”

What are you most excited about within your new role?

“Aviation Job Search is dynamic and ambitious, which I think says a lot about a company. It’s really motivating to see a company that is constantly striving for the next big thing, which fits right in with my personal ambitions.

I want to make a positive impression as soon as I can, so I’m really excited to work with the agencies that are already on board as well as expanding the existing client base.”

Why did you decide to switch from working with a generic job boards to niche job boards?

“For me this is about the new challenge that’s presented itself. The prospect of working with a niche is exciting because the types of jobs that clients are posting are so skilled, and tough to fill at times, it makes for more interesting work!

With my experience, I’m confident I’ll have a positive impact and influence on both the performance of my clients businesses and Aviation Job Search.”

Looking to promote your client’s jobs on a quality platform that provides a cost effective return on investment? Call Georgia today on 07557309053

Aviation job fears continue as Airbus to cut 15,000 jobs

Aviation job fears continue as Airbus to cut 15,000 jobs

Airbus plans to cut 15,000 jobs following the challenges coronavirus has placed on the airline industry.   1700 jobs are at risk in the UK, including major sites in Broughton in North Wales and Bristol.    Thousands more will be affected -  6000 jobs in...

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Revalidate your pilot license for free

Airline pilots made redundant can now revalidate their licenses for free with the help of our industry partner, Aviation Insider. Through a government grant (subject to conditions,) Aviation Insider will help pilots recover the cost of their simulator training. ...