What is a B1 Licenced Engineer?

What is a B1 Licenced Engineer?

B1 licensed engineers are specialist aircraft mechanics hired to plan, organise and carry out aircraft maintenance checks. These must be in line with an airline’s maintenance schedule, and when particular problems have been identified.

Category B1 licensed engineers are holders of the Part-66 License which certifies aircraft engineers according to the European Aviation Safety Agency’s (EASA) requirements. In the UK, licences are awarded by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) which also approves training organisations. Once qualified, B1 licensed engineers can work on aircraft engines and mainframes.

 

Responsibilities

The responsibilities of a B1 licensed engineer includes:

  • Undertaking tasks and projects related to aircraft maintenance
  • Exercising licence/approval in relation to the inspection and everyday processes
  • Ensuring high quality work is completed in relation to aircraft, components and completed documentation
  • Ensuring equipment, facilities and premises are maintained to an acceptable standard
  • Ensuring crews are suitably debriefed to ensure defects are accurately defined and recorded
  • Analysing and interpreting technical information relating to aircraft
  • Reading engineering diagrams and manuals
  • Working closely with other departments to complete project work

 

B1 licensed engineer jobs typically require individuals to have several years experience of aircraft maintenance and servicing inspection. Successful applicants will need to be good at trouble-shooting, be in good general health and have strong communications and interpersonal skills. Shift work is common in this role.

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How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft. Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option. Aviation welding technicians will...

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft.

Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three main categories of aerospace engineering licences in EASA member states, A, B & C.

The category B license is the standard license for practitioners and involves two disciplines – B1 & B2. The B1 mechanics license focuses on engines and airframes, while B2 avionics centres around instrumentation and electrical/ electronic equipment.

Holders of a B license are able to issue a Certificate of Release of Service of aircraft following necessary maintenance and repair checks and thus requires a much more extensive knowledge than the Category A licence.

Category C holders usually hold a B-1 or B-2 license and this enables a person to provide a Certificate of Release of Service of aircraft following a complete service or overhaul.

This article focuses on the Category B-2 license and the job prospects and general duties of a person who holds this certification.

 

B2 licensed engineer duties

  • Completing maintenance and necessary checks on aircraft instruments and electronic equipment
  • Signing off inspections and general tasks/ repair work
  • Approving the quality of completed work
  • Analysing and interpreting technical information to assist pilots
  • Understanding engineering diagrams and manuals
  • Determining the condition of the aircraft’s parts and equipment
  • Ensure crews and other departments are informed of any issues and the measures taken to rectify them

 

Working conditions

B2 licensed engineers can work varied hours, including nights, weekends, bank holidays and Christmas. Hours can be long and most engineers will be required to work overseas which could result in prolonged periods away from home.

 

Skills required

  • Capable of working under pressure, while making fast and accurate decisions
  • Thorough knowledge of aircrafts and healthy & safety procedures
  • Close attention to detail to ensure checks are completed thoroughly
  • Excellent communication skills to ensure flight crews and departments are fully informed and projects are completed on time
  • Experience of flying an aircraft is extremely advantageous
  • A good level of fitness is required as the role will include heavy lifting, lots of walking and climbing of ladders

 

Required qualifications

Aerospace engineering licences are dependent on completing relevant qualifications and gaining practical experience.

A Part-66 license can be applied for once an individual has completed a special Part-147 course, which requires less practical experience compared to other qualifications which involve completing a minimum number of hours working on various aircraft types. Practical work will be signed off and supervised by a qualified engineer.

Applicants may also study for and complete exams before gaining the relevant experience as a passed examination is valid for up to 5 years.

Applicants enrolled on a training scheme or apprenticeship will have the licensing costs paid for by the company they work for and will be released for college study and exams. These schemes are in high demand and employers will generally look for applicants who have achieved high GCSE grades.

Licenses can also be paid and studied for independently.

 

Salary expectations

The average salary of a B2 licensed engineer is between £30k-£35k a year. This figure can rise to around £50k a year with experience.

As ever, an engineer’s salary can be determined by location, with the highest paid jobs typically found in London.

 

Career progression

B2 licensed engineers can continue their professional development and work towards their Category C license. This allows an engineer to issue a Certificate of Release of Service of aircraft for the completion of a full service and aircraft overhauls and can command a higher salary.

A Category C license is obtained by completing the relevant qualifications and gaining the required amount of experience.

B2 licensed engineers can also find higher paid jobs within the military sector, or by finding employment at larger airlines; these roles require more specialised engineers with significant experience.

Search the latest Licensed Engineer jobs

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft. Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option. Aviation welding technicians will...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage handler airport jobs in British airports offering regular work. 

 

Responsibilities

As with all airport jobs, it is essential that the baggage handler team can work quickly and effectively to minimise delays, and to ensure that all the passengers get their correct luggage. They will also be tasked with loading and unloading commercial cargo items.

Although the job of a baggage handler may seem simple, it requires much attentiveness and efficiency as even small delays can quickly have an impact on the schedule at an airport. Therefore, you need to be able to work under time pressure and as part of a team.

 

Working conditions

Most airport jobs, including baggage handler often require shift work because airports are active 24 hours a day. Many also work a ‘condensed week’ which means that the baggage handler may work three shifts of 12 hours rather than 5 shifts of 8 hours and then have three days off.

The job of a baggage handler needs to be done regardless of the weather conditions. You should expect to have to work in the summer heat as well as the winter cold and rain.

Due to the large amount of heavy lifting for long periods of time, a good level of fitness and physical strength is required for this role.

In any aviation role, safety is of paramount importance. Baggage handlers need to observe strict health and safety guidelines and training will be carried out on site once an employee has been recruited.

 

Salary expectations

The average salary for these airport jobs is £16,512 pa, rising to £20,000 pa with experience. Pay by the hour is between £7 and £9. Often working overtime is an option which increases the earning potential of baggage handlers. Shift work should be expected for most roles.

 

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft. Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option. Aviation welding technicians will...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option.

Aviation welding technicians will need to be thoroughly familiar with safety requirements and ‘practice safe’ work habits. They will know how to set up, operate, and maintain all welding equipment.

It will help to have dexterity, coordination and patience. After all, it takes time to develop the skills required of proficient welding.

It’s important that aviation welding technicians and managers remain up to speed with welding technology and welding standards. In some cases, specialist aviation welding training will be given by employers.

Aviation welders and sheet metal workers tend to work in heavy engineering fabrication workshops. Aviation welding focuses on securing deck plates on aircraft, or perhaps working on sealed flexible joints and duct components for aircraft ducting systems.

Senior welding jobs may involve inventory management and ordering consumable welding materials. There will also be team management responsibilities and the need to observe health and safety standards, and working time regulations.

 

Requirements

Successful candidates applying for aircraft welding jobs tend to be educated to HND or equivalent in welding engineering or metallurgy. It might also help to have professional membership of a welding institute or qualifications as a European welding engineer.

Employers will want to see a proven background and experience within welding and metallurgy. You might specifically be expected to be competent in resistance and fusion welding, using MIG welding and TIG welding procedures.

The contract type can sometimes be temporary for aviation welding jobs depending on the size of the project. Salaries range from £30,000 per annum for a junior post, to £65,000 for senior aircraft welders.

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft. Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option. Aviation welding technicians will...

How to become a Helicopter Engineer

How to become a Helicopter Engineer

A helicopter engineer is responsible for the maintenance and repair of helicopters. These roles are usually based at airports or at flight service centres. You could work on helicopters used for transport, by the emergency services, for private use, or by the military.

You will need a license to work as a helicopter engineer and different licences allow you to work on different parts of an aircraft. For example, B1 licensed engineers will work on the structure and mechanics of an aircraft. B2 licensed engineers work on communications and navigation systems.

This job is sometimes on a shift basis. You may be required to work during the evenings or even at the weekend. You are also likely to have call-out duties.

If you are practical, have a technical mind, and have an interest in the aviation industry, a career as a helicopter engineer could be for you.

 

What does a helicopter engineer do?

Your day-to-day responsibilities might include:

  • Routinely inspecting aircraft
  • Diagnosing faults with aircraft and deciding how best to repair them
  • Carrying out any necessary repairs or replacing parts
  • Testing repairs and measuring the general performance of the aircraft
  • Ensuring that the aircraft meets all safety regulations
  • Keeping records of all work carried out on specific aircraft
  • Being available on-call for any emergency repairs
  • Providing clients with technical advice

 

What qualifications do I need to become a helicopter engineer?

To work as a helicopter engineer, you’ll need a Part-66 licence which is issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). There are different sub-categories to the licence depending on the parts of an aircraft you want to work on.

A B1 licence will allow you to carry out work that is largely mechanical. You will work on the structure of an aircraft, as well as the electrical and mechanical systems.

A B2 licence will enable you to work on avionics systems. You will work on the instruments and electrical systems that are linked to communications and navigation.

There are two routes to getting a licence. You can either study for the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) exams relevant to your licence. This is known as the self-starter route. The other option is to take an EASA Part-147 approved course.

If you follow the self-starter route, you will need a minimum of five years’ maintenance experience in addition to passing all of the examinations before you can apply for a licence. A benefit of the EASA Part-147 route is that you only need two years’ experience to qualify for a licence.

 

What skills do I need to become a helicopter engineer?

  • The ability to work in a team – You will need good teamwork skills to work alongside other engineers, diagnosing and fixing problems.
  • An eye for detail – This is important for finding faults with aircraft and for making complex repairs.
  • Problem solving ability – This will help when deciding how best to solve a fault.
  • Communication skills – These are important for giving technical advice to clients and for giving instructions to fellow engineers.
  • A technical mindset – You will need to be able to understand complex systems and how they work together to control the aircraft.

 

How much does a helicopter engineer earn?

Starting salary: £30,000 – £35,000
Experienced: £35,000 – £45,000
Senior: £50,000
(These are intended as a rough guide and can vary depending between employers.)

 

What are your career prospects as a helicopter engineer?

As you gain experience, you could take on a senior role as an engineering manager and supervise other engineers. You could also progress to become a design engineer and work on enhancing the design of an aircraft.
You could also do further training to work on other types of aircraft, such as commercial planes.

 

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

How to become a B2 Licensed Engineer

A B2 licensed engineer focuses on managing the necessary maintenance and repair checks concerned with the electrical systems and equipment on an aircraft. Under Part-66, the common European legal framework for certifying licensed aircraft engineers, there are three...

What is a Baggage Handler?

What is a Baggage Handler?

A team of baggage handlers will ensure that passengers’ bags are loaded and unloaded safely, efficiently and in good time from the aircraft. This helps ensure that the passenger turnaround can go as planned and the airport functions on schedule. There are many baggage...

What is an Aviation Welder?

What is an Aviation Welder?

There are many opportunities for professional welders or sheet metal workers within the aviation industry. Earning potential for aviation welding jobs ranges from £30k (US$50k) to £65k (US$100k), so it’s an attractive career option. Aviation welding technicians will...