How to answer: ‘What is your greatest weakness?’

How to answer: ‘What is your greatest weakness?’

‘What is your greatest weakness?’ is a dreaded interview question which is usually sprung on candidates the moment they start to feel comfortable. Many find this question to be frustrating and unfair as no one will want to reduce their chances of getting the job by confessing their flaws. Because of this, some candidates will deny that they have any flaws at all, or panic and reveal too much to the interviewer. Others might use the ‘pretend a strength is a weakness’ technique. Unfortunately, interviewers are wise to this and saying that you’re ‘too much of a perfectionist’ is unlikely to cut it.

So, what is the right way to answer this question? With a little preparation, the following tips will help you put together a great answer that will get you through any interview. The first step, as with many interview questions, is understanding why so many recruiters insist on asking this question.

 

Why do interviewers ask ‘What is your greatest weakness’?

With this simple question, recruiters can find out a lot about you. They can find out how good you are at coping under pressure. They will discover how honest and self-aware you are about your own abilities. They will be able to see how pro-active you are in trying to address your own weaknesses. Your choice of weakness will also demonstrate how well you understand the skills required for the job. For example, if you talk about struggling with a skill that is essential for the role, this is a red flag for recruiters.

Bearing these things in mind, recruiters aren’t just looking at what you answer but how you answer. Ideally, they will want a self-aware employee who doesn’t have any weaknesses that will directly impact their ability to do the job but is proactive about any weaknesses they do have. They will also be very careful about employing someone they suspect has lied to them as dishonest interviewees may well become dishonest employees.

Your answer should therefore be an honest portrayal of a genuine weakness, including steps you have taken to work on it.

 

How to answer:

We have already established that your answer needs two components:

  • A weakness
  • How you are addressing that weakness

So, how do you go about choosing the right weakness to talk about? Start by asking yourself questions such as ‘have I ever made a mistake at work?’ or ‘has anyone ever commented on a skill that you could do with improving?’. Put together a list of your answers.

The next step is to cross-reference your list with the job description. You’ll want to cross off any that are listed as essential skills for the job. Now you should have a refined list of possible weaknesses for your answer.

Finally, for each of these weaknesses, write another list of the ways in which you’ve tried to address them. Once you’re done with this, we recommend you pick the strongest three to practice for your interview.

You should now have three weaknesses that are genuine, not essential for the job, and things that you can improve. Choose your favourite and put more time into practicing with this weakness. It’s good to have a couple of extra examples up your sleeve in case they ask for more than one in the question.

We always advise candidates not to memorise answers word-for-word for interviews. This tends to give your responses a robotic feel that can come across as unnatural. It is important to remember that a successful interview will be a dialogue between you and the recruiters. They need to work out if your personality is a good fit for the company and this is difficult if you’re reciting a pre-prepared speech for each answer.

Instead, we recommend that you prepare your answers as bullet points. This way you can adjust your answer to follow the flow of the conversation. This will also help your answers feel much more authentic and engaging for your interviewer.

 

How not to answer:

There are several traps that candidates sometimes fall into when answering this question. Here are some of the answers that you should try to avoid giving:

  • Saying that you don’t have any weaknesses: There are several flaws with this strategy. First of all, it looks like you are dishonest or trying to hide something. The recruiter won’t believe you if you say this – after all, you’re only human! It also makes you look unprepared. As this is such a common interview question, they will expect you to have thought about it in advance.
  • Confessing that you lack a skill essential for the job: Whatever you do, don’t raise any questions about your ability to do the job. If you go through the process of cross-referencing you answers with the job description, you can make sure this doesn’t happen.
  • Using the old ‘turning a negative into a positive’ technique: This used to be a popular piece of advice for interview candidates, however, recruiters will have come across so many ‘perfectionists’ or candidates claiming to ‘work too hard’ that this tactic probably won’t work any more. Your answer will be perceived as weak and you may be asked to give another example.
  • Revealing too much: A concise and simple explanation will do. Don’t ramble on and give the impression that you have lots of flaws that could compromise your ability to do your job.

 

Example:

A candidate for an aircraft engineering job:

I would say that my biggest weakness is my writing ability. I was always much better at technical subjects at school like maths and science but struggled with English lessons. I used to worry about filling out reports because of this but I’ve learned to allocate myself more time for paperwork and I find a quiet place to work where I can concentrate properly. This has improved the quality of my reports to the extent that my manager has commented on how much clearer they have become. It’s still not something I find easy, but I have found a way to make sure that my paperwork is of a high standard. 

Why we like this answer: Writing ability wasn’t on the job description for this role so it was a good skill for the candidate to target. They have shown that they faced the issue head-on and found a solution which worked to the extent that their manager was impressed.

 

 

More interview advice:

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How to answer ‘Tell me about yourself’ in a job interview

How to answer ‘Tell me about yourself’ in a job interview

There are a handful of job interview questions that you are almost guaranteed to get asked regardless of the role, industry, or level of experience. The dreaded ‘Tell me about yourself’ is one of those. This is used by many interviewers as a bit of an icebreaker to get you chatting and is often the first thing they will ask you once you sit down. This means that your answer will set the tone for the whole interview, so it’s really important that you get it right.

Many job candidates panic in the face of this question and either treat the interviewer to a rendition of their life story or go robotically through their CV. This question is, in fact, a fantastic opportunity to show your interviewers exactly how you’re the perfect fit for the job and to build a bit of rapport with them at the same time.

As you know that this question is highly likely to come up your interviewer will expect you to have thought about it. You really have no excuse to just wing it. The secret, as with most interview questions, is preparation. But where do you start? We’ve put together this simple three-step guide to help you craft the perfect answer. But first, we want to explain exactly why interviewers ask such a tricky and open-ended question. This is the first step in working out what they want you to say.

 

Why do interviewers ask this question?

So, why do interviewers insist on asking such a vague and open-ended question? Some candidates view this as a frustrating and even lazy question that is very likely to trip you up as soon as the interview has started. However, there are many great reasons interviewers choose to start with this question and once you understand these, you’re well on your way to a brilliant answer.

The first important thing to understand is that the interviewer is not deliberately trying to be mean. In fact, they are probably hoping that you are the right person for the job. The fewer people they have to interview for the role, the easier their life will be. However, they do need to get it right as a bad hire could be detrimental to the business and would reflect badly on them.

An open-ended question like this is an ideal opportunity for interviewers to get an idea of how you think. They will often be more interested in how you answer the question than what you actually say. It will weed out those candidates who weren’t prepared and will also give them an idea of what you think is important for them to know as a potential employer. With the things you choose to talk about, you will reveal whether or not you really understand what skills and experience are relevant to the job. Is your answer structured, articulate, and focused on the role on offer? Or is it a rambling and irrelevant recitation of your life story? Many roles will require good communication and organisation skills and this is a great opportunity to show these skills off with a clear and logical answer.

Many candidates will immediately over-think the question and panic as they try and figure out what the interviewer wants them to say. The question you’re actually being asked to answer is ‘Tell me about yourself in the context of how you will add value to the company’. If you gear your answer to this version of the question instead, you will end up with a more concise, structured answer that is much more useful for your interviewer.

 

How to answer:

Your answer should be different for each role you interview for but should always contain the same basic components. A brief introduction to who you are professionally, what experience or skills you have that make you ideal for this role, and why you are interested in this particular position.

At this point, it’s useful to remember that you’ll have time to go through the finer points of your CV later and that interviews work best as a conversation. Keep your answer relatively short and don’t be tempted to launch into a long monologue. It might be useful to view this as a sort of elevator pitch for yourself.

 

Step 1: Research

We’ve already established that your answer needs to be focused on how you’re going to add value to the company. So how do you find out which of your qualities you should try and highlight? More often than not, this information will be on the job description. Spend some time cross-referencing your experience with the most important skills the job description asks for. If the job description doesn’t list the company values or goals, their website probably will. Also, do a search to see if the company has featured in the news recently and see if you can learn anything about the direction they are moving in.

 

Step 2: Structure

Now you know what you want to highlight, you need to work out how you’ll say it. It’s easiest if you break your answer down into three parts:

  • Your professional introduction: Decide how you want your interviewer to perceive you and start from here. Offer them a brief overview of where you are in your professional career.
  • How your experience makes you the perfect candidate for the role: Take a couple of examples and highlight how these demonstrate the skills they are looking for. This is where your research comes in. Prepare 4 or 5 points – you won’t need all of them but it’s always good to have a few examples on standby.
  • Why this role interests you: Does your current opportunity lack challenges or the chance for progression? Is there something about the company that you find particularly attractive?

 

Step 3: Practice

Organise your answer in brief bullet points and use these as prompts. It’s important that you don’t memorise your answer word-for-word as this can sound unnatural. It might help to ask a friend to listen to your answer to make sure you sound articulate and that the points you want to make are clear.

You will find that this exercise will benefit the rest of the answers you give in your interview and will help you speak more fluently about what you have to offer in the context of that particular job.

 

How not to answer:

Here are some of the common traps that candidates fall into when trying to answer the question.

  • The life story: Whatever you do, don’t give your interviewer a step-by-step outline of your life starting with your birth. They just aren’t interested and the vast majority won’t be relevant. This can also turn into a bit of a directionless ramble and everyone will forget what the question was in the first place – which isn’t a good thing.
  • Being too modest: Some candidates will find shouting about their own skills and attributes really difficult. If this sounds like you, try not to be too modest. Instead, stick to the facts. This also has the advantage of keeping your answers concise and clear.
  • Getting personal: Remember that this is a job interview – they don’t want to hear about your family or what you do with your weekends. Stay professional and don’t stray too far from the job.
  • Repeating your CV: Don’t just walk your interviewer through your CV. This isn’t a very engaging way to conduct a conversation and is just a rehash of what they already know about you.

 

If you follow these tips, you should be able to create an answer that turns this daunting interview question, into a brilliant opportunity to showcase why you are the perfect candidate for the job. For more advice, read our article on interview tips for aviation jobs.

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Air Hostess Jobs: Interview Tips

Air Hostess Jobs: Interview Tips

The application process for air hostess jobs can be highly competitive, so being well prepared for your interview will help you stand out from the crowd. Job interviews can be nerve-wracking and some people cope well under pressure better than others. To help you perform at your best, we have put together a guide that will help you get ready for the big day. The most worrying part of any job interview is not knowing what questions the interview panel might ask, so we’ve also included some example questions to help you practice.

Research

The first stage in your preparation should be research. Read as much as you can about the airline you have been called to interview with. Whether you’re hoping to work for Ryanair, Emirates, easyJet or British Airways, you must have a full understanding of which airport bases they use, which routes they fly, and the types of aircraft they use for commercial flights.

“What do you know about the company”, is a question often asked in interviews, so having a good answer up your sleeve will help you appear prepared and enthusiastic about the airline.

If you have applied through a recruitment agency, they will usually give you all the information you need to prepare for the interview. Always ask if there is something you’re not sure about. Some agencies also offer practice interview sessions, so sign up to one of these if it’s available.

Practice

Practicing interview questions will help you provide clear and concise answers on the day. As you don’t know what the interviewer is going to ask, it is best to practice both questions specific to the role and more general interview questions. Here are some examples to help you. 

Would you be willing to relocate for the role?

  • This is an opportunity to demonstrate your commitment to the job.
  • Explain that you are willing to change your lifestyle.

How do you respond to stressful situations?

  • As a cabin crew member, you will have to keep a cool head and not make any rash decisions if any problems arise.
  • Explain how you would listen to complaints attentively and offer a reasonable solution.
  • Provide an example of how you have dealt with a similar situation in the past.

What languages do you speak?

  • Of course many airlines are looking for flight attendants with language skills so make sure you get the chance to flag up your language skills if you have any.

Do you like children?

  • Be prepared for this question as cabin crew are often required to assist with children.
  • Give examples of experience you have of dealing with children.

Where do you want to be in five years time?

  • This is a classic interview question and the interviewer wants to get an idea of whether you will stay with the company if they hire you.
  • This is also an opportunity to show some ambition. Make sure your answer is realistic but shows that you want to improve and progress within the company.

What are your strengths?

  • Make sure you have around 3 strengths prepared for this question and that they are all related to the role.
  • Have examples prepared for all the strengths you want to say that you have.

Why do you want to work for this airline?

  • This is where you can show off the research you have done prior to the interview.
  • Explain why you want to work for them and not one of their competitors – remember that the interviewer won’t want to train someone and risk losing them to another airline.

It is best to not prepare exact answers to your questions. If you sound like you are reciting learned answers your personality won’t shine through. It is better to make some bullet points for each question and then practice talking about them as naturally as you can. Always try and give examples of how you have demonstrated particular skills when you’re giving an answer.  

Presentation

Make sure you have thought about what you are going to wear before the day. What you wear can make a difference in any job interview and it is especially important for cabin crew. You will be expected to look smart at all times while on duty and representing the airline, so it is important that you look smart for your interview. If you are unsure, it is always better to be overdressed than underdressed and looking sloppy.

The Interview

Make sure you know exactly where you are going and how long it will take you to get there. It is important to leave some extra time in case there are any travel delays on the way. Even if you arrive very early, at least you can sit wait in your car or in a nearby cafe until the time of your interview, rather than rushing in late.

Aim to show up to the interview itself around 5-10 minutes early. This allows time for you to sign into the building if necessary and shows that you are organised and punctual.   

A classic interview tip is to greet your interviewer with a firm handshake. Equally important is to be friendly and confident as you greet them. A smile and asking them how they are will help break the ice.

Make sure you’ve brought along another copy of your CV with you. This means that you can refer to it without stumbling and you can offer it to the interviewer if they haven’t brought a copy.

Questions to ask the interviewer

As the interview is nearing the end, you will usually be asked if you have any questions about the role or the company. It is a good idea to have a handful of questions prepared. This is a great opportunity to ask some insightful questions and prove that you organised and have researched thoroughly.

Take a list of questions into the interview with you. As some of the questions are likely to have been answered naturally in the general conversation during the interview, it is a good idea to have around 10 prepared. This means that you can choose the most relevant when you are asked.

Here are some ideas for the types of questions you could ask:

  • How do you measure the progress of staff in this role?
  • How much training do you offer your staff?
  • What is the potential for promotion in this role?
  • How would you describe the company culture?
  • Can you give some examples of how previous staff members have progressed from this role?

At the end of the interview

As the interview is coming to a close, remember to ask if there are any next stages in the process and what sort of timescale they are looking at for making their decision. Finally, make sure that you thank the interviewer for their time.

After the interview

Make sure you remember to follow up on the interview. If you have an email address for your interviewer, it is a good idea to thank them again for meeting with you and this is also an opportunity to ask any further questions you might have. Keep this brief and to the point.

If you aren’t successful, always ask for feedback as this will help you prepare for your next interview.

 

Good luck!

Ryanair launches new pilot training scheme

This week, Ryanair announced a new pilot training partnership with Cork-based international flight school, Atlantic Flight Training Academy (AFTA.) An Tánaiste, Simon Coveney, launched the partnership which will create 50 new jobs and facilitate Ryanair’s continued...

Gain experience and soar

Are you a student or recent graduate and wondering about where your future is heading? Knowing exactly what you want to do and where you want to work can seem daunting early on in your career. However, fear not as help could be at hand. Work experience is one of the...

Interview tips for aviation jobs

Interview tips for aviation jobs

When you’re in the hot seat in front of a potential employer, the way you handle those interview nerves and tough questions could mean the difference between getting or losing your dream aviation job.

Here are a few top interview tips on how to settle those jangling nerves, make the right impression and secure that job.

 

The Basics – a checklist:

  • Check you have read the job advertisement and description before your interview.
  • Ensure you meet the requirements and you have a positive answer for any areas you don’t fully meet.
  • Research the company’s products, staff, culture, clients and competitors.
  • Ensure you know the correct name of your interviewers and their job titles.
  • Be sure you know what type of interview you’ll be attending. Different companies prefer one-to-one interviews, panel interviews, assessment centres, and/or use psychometric testing.
  • Make sure you know where you’re going – get a map and plan your journey in advance, allowing for delayed trains and accidents.
  • Have your CV, references and any additional information requested, to hand.
  • Dress appropriately, but check with the culture of the office too. If in doubt, overdress.
  • Layout your clothing the day before to make sure it’s ready.
  • Read over your CV and make sure you know it back to front.
  • Focus on your achievements when asked interview questions and portray every response in a positive way.
  • Don’t interrupt your interviewer and give a steady handshake when entering.
  • Prepare model answers for any tricky questions you believe they may ask you. Prepare examples of how you’ve used each of the skills that you want to highlight.

 

Prepare your own questions in advance, which might include:

  • What are the goals for the department or business over the next one to five years?
  • What business challenges do you foresee and how do you plan to overcome these?
  • What challenges do you envisage in this role?
  • How would you describe the company culture?

Unless prompted, do not ask what the salary/benefits will be if this is the first interview. You could ask if there are any areas they would like further clarification on at the end – just to be able to have a second opportunity if necessary. Ask what the next steps are, eg what’s the follow-up procedure, when will they let you know whether you’ve got a second or third interview.

 

Second opportunities

If you feel upon reflection you could have answered a question in a better way or failed to get an important achievement across, why not follow up with a letter thanking the interviewer for their time and reiterate your suitability for the post.

 

Unsuccessful at your aviation job interview?

If you are unsuccessful in your interview, it’s worth a call to request feedback – while they are very busy they should oblige and offer you some valuable tips as to where you could have improved.

 

Successful in your aviation job?

Fantastic, you have secured a job offer! However, before rushing to resign from your current job, ask them to send you an offer of employment in writing.

 

Explore the articles below to find out how to answer some of those tough interview questions.

How to answer: ‘What is your greatest weakness?’

What are interviewers looking for when they ask about your weaknesses? Some will deny that they have any, or panic and reveal too much. Others might pretend a strength is a weakness. Unfortunately, saying you’re ‘too much of a perfectionist’ is unlikely to cut it. Here are our top tips and examples.

How to answer ‘Tell me about yourself’ in a job interview

Tell me about youself’ is commonly used as an icebreaker and is often the first thing an interviewer will ask. This means that your answer will set the tone for the whole interview, so it’s important you get it right. This simple three-step guide will help you craft the perfect answer.

Air Hostess Jobs: Interview Tips

The application process for cabin crew jobs can be highly competitive, so being well prepared for your interview will help you stand out from the crowd. To help you perform at your best, we’ve put together this guide with our top tips. We’ve also included some example questions to help you practice.

Interview tips for aviation jobs

When you’re in the hot seat in front of a potential employer, the way you handle those interview nerves and tough questions could mean the difference between getting or losing your dream aviation job. Here are a few top interview tips on how to make the right impression and secure that job.

What to expect of role play and group tasks at cabin crew Assessment Days

Throughout the assessment day recruiters will be watching to see how you work within a team and as an individual, as well as assessing skills like leadership and listening. Some airlines have role play and group tasks as part of the selection process. Here we look at them in a little more detail.

What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew Assessment Days?

What kinds of tests take place at cabin crew Assessment Days?

As part of the airline cabin crew assessment day, you may be asked to perform a series of tests, writes Patricia Green.

I am often asked on the forum what are involved in these, so thought it would be helpful to cover them in more detail here! They are not there to be difficult or to trick you but to see if you have the basic knowledge skills that a cabin crew member needs.

Tests do differ from airline to airline and the questions here are examples taken from different airlines over the last year. There are also a few simple tips I can give you – it is all in the preparation!

 

The Reach Test

Firstly, there is the ‘reach test’ this is the first and most important as it is simply pass or fail as you have to be able to reach to 210 or 210 cm for most airlines. This is without shoes and allowed on tip toes with either one or both hands, fingertips reaching to the marker.

You do need to be able to do this as you have to be able to reach the safety equipment onboard the aircraft in the overhead lockers. Do mark a point on the wall and practice reaching it – it is surprising how many people miss this opportunity by not realizing how important it is! Some airlines in Asia have a slightly lower reach test as do some of the regional airlines, depending on aircraft type, so these are worth considering if you cannot reach the marker.

 

Maths Tests

The maths test always worries everyone but you don’t have to be a star maths pupil to survive it, just think practically. It will involve using basic maths in a cabin crew situation – so for example:
• A meal cart fits 6 trays horizontally and 12 trays vertically, how many trays are there in the cart?
• A passenger buys 2 coffees at 2.99 GBP and gives you 10.00 GBP, what change do you give?

Also consider currency exchange (they will give you the rate… and you may get a calculator!) so with the last question:

• What if they gave you 10 euro, what change would you give? The rate is 1.10.

Basically, if you have passed your maths GCSE or equivalent as the requirements ask, then you will be fine!

 

Language Tests

The English test used by some of the airlines in the Middle East is about an hour long. It does change and subjects will differ, but just as an idea of what to expect:

Read a cabin crew story – you must answer 5 multiple choice questions about the story to check your understanding.

• Match the task to text – this checks that you understand the meaning of words eg. reliable, considered etc. and phrases such as ‘take it or leave it’ for example.
• Read a cover letter – answer 5 multiple choice questions about it
• Essay – write about a specified subject. ‘Who is your inspiration and why?’, ‘If I ruled a country, which country would I rule and why?’ or ‘What traits do you like or not like about yourself? How and why would you change them?’

If you are worried about your English skills there are books and courses online that specialize in English for Cabin Crew, so it may be worth perfecting your fluency. The current standard for cabin crew in Aviation English is ICAO level 4, but you do not need a special qualification.

Foreign language speakers may also be asked to complete a test in their alternate language to check fluency level, if they are being recruited for language skills. This is often an oral test with a recruiter who speaks your language.

 

General Knowledge Tests

Of course, no two airline tests are the same, so you can just use this as a basic guide for the assessment day. There may also be a general knowledge test which includes things like geography, airport codes, currency or the 24 hour clock.

While you do not need to study any of these in detail, they will also be useful for your training once you get through. Do take a look too at the airlines route map (learn some airport codes…) and also research a little about the aircraft fleet and the airlines current product and history. This will really help you shine in your tests and show professional knowledge in the final interview stage.

 

About the Author:

Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant.

She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit Cabin Crew Consultant.

Ryanair launches new pilot training scheme

This week, Ryanair announced a new pilot training partnership with Cork-based international flight school, Atlantic Flight Training Academy (AFTA.) An Tánaiste, Simon Coveney, launched the partnership which will create 50 new jobs and facilitate Ryanair’s continued...

Gain experience and soar

Are you a student or recent graduate and wondering about where your future is heading? Knowing exactly what you want to do and where you want to work can seem daunting early on in your career. However, fear not as help could be at hand. Work experience is one of the...

What to expect of role play and group tasks at cabin crew Assessment Days

What to expect of role play and group tasks at cabin crew Assessment Days

By Patricia Green

The assessment day for airline cabin crew is not an easy one, and getting a job as cabin crew can seem like an almost impossible task! You do have to run through a series of stages and tests before you can proceed to the final interview stage, and for many it is the hardest part.

These are important parts of the assessment day as the recruiters will be watching to see how you work within a team and as an individual, as well as assessing skills like leadership and listening. Some airlines have role play and group tasks and some just group tasks and discussions as part of the cabin crew selection process. Here we can look at them in a little more detail and find out what the recruiters are looking for.

TOP TIP: This is where the majority of applicants will make mistakes and have to leave the assessment day, so it is your chance to show you have the right skill set for being cabin crew.

Role play in focus

This is where the recruiters will be watching to see how you deal with challenges and unusual situations and is very important to the role of cabin crew. They may use an incident you could have onboard or in another job. It is up to you, to deal with the matter efficiently with initiative and most importantly, with a successful conclusion…

Example 1: You are working in a restaurant and the angry customer says his meal is cold. What do you do?
Apologize and be polite. Take the meal away and say you will get a new one from the kitchen as quickly as you can. Maybe offer him a free drink whilst he is waiting…. Worst case scenario, call for the supervisor for assistance.

Example 2: A passenger complains that he doesn’t want to sit next to the family with children. What do you do?
Apologize and be polite. Explain maybe there was a mix up at check in but not to worry, you’ll check the passenger list and see where you can find him a more suitable seat. Even better offer a choice of seats. It is not a good idea to talk about this in front of the family, so keep things discreet, they will be stressed enough as it is!

Group task

The group task can vary widely at each assessment day, you may have to build a structure out of unusual items like straws and paperclips (!) or take part in an imagined scenario, like being stuck on a desert island. These show teamwork, initiative and communication – all vital skills of cabin crew.

Example: You are survivors of a ship wreck, on a desert island. You have limited resources and little chance of escape, what should you do? Each person will be given an identity (eg. Mary, age 65, a grandmother or Sam and 18 year old student) and you have to work out a scenario to stay or go as given by your recruiters – they will give you clues. So you may have enough resources to build a life raft? They will then ask you to discuss why people should stay or go and why and also you may have to argue for your identity to stay or go!

Do act fairly at all times and listen well to what everyone has to say… Work as a team and contribute to the scenario, bringing others in where you can. You may show a little leadership quality but not too much!

Tips:
• Never speak over anyone else
• Make sure you have equal time speaking to everyone else, don’t be too talkative but don’t remain silent
• Use your initiative in the tasks to show you are thinking creatively
• Try and bring in other members of the group to show teamwork – for example: ’ I agree with what John is saying but we could use your idea too.’
• Watch what you say!
• Do not use the word ‘no’ or say anything negative or put anyone down.

Hopefully this quick guide to acting your role play and group task will give you a little more focus and direction in your next assessment day. Remember every assessment day is a learning curve, use your experience each time and the process will get easier. Good Luck!

About the author:

Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. More recently Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant.

She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips.

For more information please visit www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com

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