How to write a standout CV

How to write a standout CV

Writing a successful CV can seem like a daunting task, but there are some simple tips to follow which can make it much easier. Throughout this blog, we’ve covered everything from what recruiters are secretly looking for to how you should present your CV. Ultimately, your goal is to tailor your CV to each job and company you apply for, showcasing all your relevant skills and experience. When you’ve created your standout CV, you’re then ready to apply for your dream job!

 

First things first, what are recruiters looking for?

Many recruitment decisions are based on cold hard facts so a recruiter will be going through your CV looking for evidence that you can perform. These facts may include:

Your position in the hierarchy – It’s important for recruiters to understand where you would best fit in their team. Include information such as who you report in to, if you work independently or if you manage anyone.  

Numbers – Recruiters will look for ways of quantifying your value to your previous company in numbers. This could include revenue generated, percentage of targets hit, flight time clocked, or time taken to achieve a project. Providing strong evidence in figures gives a prospective employer an idea of what return on investment they will receive by employing you.  

What your current employer does – If you’re currently working for a lesser known company, make sure you add an explanation of what the company does so they can put your role into context. If you’re company is more well known, ensure that you describe how your department and role contributes to the wider business.

Technology expertise – Most jobs bring you into contact with some form of technology so recruiters will be keen to learn your level of ability.

The objective of your previous role – The most important thing to include is ‘what were you hired to do?’ A recruiter can then put your hard work and results into context.

Examples of past work – Whatever tangible work you have produced, ensure you state it clearly on your CV, indicating the volume and quality of work produced, and how this benefited the business.

How you interact with other people – The aviation industry will bring you into direct contact with many people, including international citizens where English may not be their first language. Recruiters will be looking for evidence that you are able to communicate clearly and effectively with them.

 

Where do I start?

Now you know what employers are looking for, there’s just one final thing you need to do before starting to write your CV – research.  If you spend some time doing research into the company you’re applying to, you may gain some insights that will help you write your standout CV. You should be able to find out online what sort of company culture they have and what kind of people they employ.

You need to demonstrate that you understand what the company does, what their position within the industry is and how you can align your experience, interests and values with the goals of the company. Having a basic understanding of the company and their aspirations will also help you when you get to the interview stage.

Remember to pay close attention to the job description. This will be full of clues about what the recruiters are looking for, especially in terms of skills and experience.

 

Writing your CV

Firstly, your CV should include some basic but vital information about you so that recruiters know who you are and how they can get in touch with you. Make sure you include:

 

 

Your full name

A professional email address

Your address

Your phone number

Your nationality

Links to any relevant blog / social presence

Personal statement

If you choose to include a personal statement, this should sit under your basic information. It should be a short paragraph that describes who you are and what you’re about, including your career goals and what you could bring to their company. They are similar in nature to a cover letter, just shorter – usually one paragraph.

It’s not mandatory to include this section but with average recruiters spending an average of just 8.8 seconds looking at your CV, this is your chance to give them a reason to read on. They are particularly useful in a competitive industry as they are the perfect way to grab the recruiters attention.

Avoid being vague or broad as employers might think that you’ve sent this CV to everyone and that you’re just applying for anything – really tailor your personal statement to the company you’re applying for. Aim for something similar to this.

After graduating, I spent one year travelling the world which has given me a great understanding and passion for different cultures, languages and practices. As a result, I am able to communicate clearly and effectively with many international citizens, which I believe would be extremely important in this position as a [insert job title]

 

Flight hours

It’s really important to include hours relevant for the position and split by type. For example:

X hours as Pilot in Command

X hours as Second in Command

X hours on a Boeing 777  

 

Qualifications and education

In this section, list all your certificates and ratings starting with your highest held or most recent certificate. You need to indicate that you meet the requirements of the job vacancy so include the licence types, any medical certificates and the country the licences were issued in.  

When listing your education, only list the most recent college or university that you attended. Include the title of the qualification, the grade awarded and the date achieved. If you are still in education, you are entitled to list it but ensure that you make it clear that it hasn’t been completed yet.  

Try and stick to bullet points in this section. If you do have months where you were out of work or education, keep your explanation brief. If an employer requires more information, they will ask you to elaborate during an interview.

 

 

Experience

This is usually the most prominent section on a CV and it’s worth spending some time making sure you have identified the most relevant experience for the job. This section is normally laid out in reverse chronological order with most recent experience at the top.

Keep your experience short and accurate, listing the company name, duration of employment in years, your title and the type of aircraft that you flew on.

You may have one particular job or work experience that you really want to highlight. You could create a new section titled ‘Engineering Experience’, or ‘Flight Experience’ and put this first. Your remaining experiences can then be put under ‘Further Experience’.

 

If this is your first job in aviation, lead with your qualifications and then add detail on the transferable skills you have gained from your experience. If you’ve been in the game a while, start with you experience as it’s more recent and relevant to the job.

Skills

Amongst others, employers will be looking out for skills such as positivity, loyalty, creativity, adaptability, tenacity and being a team player. These are highly desirable for employers and should be mentioned in your CV personal statement or cover letter.

Avoid using buzzwords or including skills for the sake of it. If you make a statement, back it up with an example of how you demonstrated that trait.

If you’re new to the aviation industry, demonstrate how you have transferable skills from other industries you’ve worked in. For example, you’ve only ever worked in a restaurant and you’re applying for a cabin crew position. Demonstrate how your time at the restaurant taught you:

Valuable insights into the hospitality industry.

How to communicate with customers effectively.

Excellent customer service skills, including being patient and resilient.

How to pay attention to detail in a fast paced environment.

How to deal with handling money.   

 

How to multitask.

Past work experience that might not appear to be directly relevant to the job at hand might show another dimension, depth, ability, or skill that actually is relevant or applicable.”

Alyssa Gelbard, Career Expert

Interests & Hobbies

A section on your CV which includes a diverse range of interests can help you seem interesting and personable. Highlight interests that have helped you develop the skills that the employer is looking for. Don’t mention ‘passive interests’ such as watching TV or playing games, especially if the job requires you working alongside other people.

Interests and hobbies are subjective. Some employers believe that they are an integral part of the application, whereas some will only find them beneficial if they are looking for a particular fit in their company culture.

 

References

References act as a third party endorsement and are used by hiring managers to reassure them that they are about to offer a position to the right candidate.

Only include references on your CV if you’ve been asked to in the job description. Avoid the classic line ‘References available on request’. This is unnecessary and takes up valuable room on your CV. An employer will contact you for details of references if they are considering offering you a position.

 

When contacting your reference, they could ask for:

A character reference

Details about responsibility

Length of employment

Punctuality and attendance

Overall performance

Reason for leaving

 

Who should I choose?

Choose your referees carefully, usually it would be your most recent employer. If you don’t have a recent employer, teachers, business acquaintances, customers and organisational leaders can all verify that you are who you say you are.

Avoid choosing family or friends where possible. It’s also considered good etiquette to ask for people’s permission to act as your referee. By notifying them beforehand, it also gives them chance to prepare for any questions, should they be contacted.  

 

What are they saying about you?

Under the Data Protection Act, you have the right to view any references given by your previous employers. If you disagree with any comments, you may wish to address the matter with you previous employer or remove them as your reference in future applications.  

Contrary to popular belief, previous employers can give a bad reference, providing that it is accurate and fair – and that they have evidence to back up any bold statements, for example, that you were sacked.

 

 

How to format your CV

Making your CV look professional and easy to read is essential. Recruiters are ‘time poor’ so you should aim for one or two pages of A4, but no more. The upper-middle area of the first page is known as the ‘CV hotspot’. This is where the eye naturally falls so think about including your most important experience or ‘key attributes’ here.

Top tips

  • Avoid huge chunks of text – bullet points will make the information easier to read and digest
  • Sans-serif fonts such as Helvetica or Arial make for an easy read  
  • Make headings bold and clear, but not oversized
  • Avoid using confusing subheadings
  • Stick to conventional colours – printing your CV in neon will make you stand out but for all the wrong reasons!

If you are sending your CV via email, send it as a PDF unless otherwise specified. If you’re sending it via post, you could look at getting your CV professionally printed – or printing it yourself on good quality paper.

 

Like what you’ve read?

If you like what you’ve read in this blog, you can download the whole thing in a handy PDF format. Simply click the red button to get yours now.

 

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest aviation job site in the world! For decades, we’ve been helping unite candidates with employers, so it’s safe to say that we know a thing or two about helping you in your search.

We believe that if you choose a job you love, you’ll never have to ‘work’ another day again. That’s why we continuously strive to provide our jobseekers with all the best jobs from right around the world.

If you’re looking for your next challenge, why not browse all the latest jobs near you right now? Start your journey today at www.aviationjobsearch.com

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We’ve launched a forum!

We’ve launched a forum!

We’re pleased to announce that we have launched a brand new forum for our aviation professionals to connect, discuss and debate industry topics. Our ultimate goal is to create a strong community whereby like minded individuals can ask questions, share knowledge, give support and in some cases, make friends.

The forum came about after speaking to jobseekers during events that we attend (such as EBACE and the Dublin Aviation Summit) and finding that there was a need for a platform whereby they could ask other professionals in the industry how they got on the first step of the ladder in their career.

We’re hoping to attract employers and other senior professionals who will engage with our jobseeker community and give them the answers that they are searching for.

However, we’re not solely limiting the platform to just careers advice. There’s plenty of space and scope for discussions about anything aviation related. Looking to find out how you cope with flight fatigue? Or where is the best place to go on a three day layover in Dubai? Ask the question and other industry professionals will hopefully reach out and share their expertise with you.

Managing Director of Aviation Job Search, Dave Capper said, “I’m really excited about this new venture. We started a forum on one our sister websites ‘Cabin Crew’ a few years back and we were amazed at how popular it became in such a short space of time. We’re hoping to replicate the success of that forum with our new one.”

To join the forum, simply click here and register.

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Best ways to find a guilt-free work balance

Best ways to find a guilt-free work balance

With our modern lifestyles becoming more and more dynamic, the debate on what work-life balance means proves to be quite relevant today. We caught up with Daniel Ross, Marketing Executive at Roubler to see what he had to say on this pressing issue. 

Work-life balance is defined as the extent to which a person feels fulfilled in both professional and personal aspects of their life. Basically, it’s when you achieve a healthy combination of work and play. What is interesting is how subjective it is for each one of us. For some, it might mean being able to leave work early or having weekends totally free. For others, it might mean having a completely flexible schedule. Ultimately, only you can perceive if your life is in balance or not.  

 

History

The concept of work-life balance emerged as early as the 18th century when the first laws were enacted to limit the number of working hours allowed for employees. Laws supporting mandatory leave for particular life events, such as childbirth and illnesses, were also passed.

This was largely spurred on by the influx of women in the workforce, who lobbied for shorter working weeks and flexible schedules to be able to juggle work and caring for their families. Nowadays, the discussion on work-life balance includes all working individuals, and even identifies distinct groups such as single parents.

 

Established Effects

People who consider themselves to have a balanced work and personal life generally have lower levels of stress and depression, and higher levels of satisfaction in life. In contrast, work-life imbalance is also associated with elevated levels of the “stress hormone” cortisol, increased blood pressure and heart rate, ill health, and depression.

These effects have an impact in both aspects of our lives. On a professional level, for instance, work-life balance translates to pro-social behavior, engagement, and productivity, while failure to achieve it results in absenteeism, job dissatisfaction, and burnout. On a personal level, engagement in relationships, personal development, and good self-esteem are associated with work-life balance, while guilt, regret, and depression tend to occur without it.

 

Why Is It Hard to Achieve?

Now that we have established the importance of work-life balance, the big question is, “Why is it hard to achieve?” Hectic lifestyles combined with ubiquitous technology may have something to do with it.

In the era of the Internet, computers, and mobile phones, convenient access to these portable technologies can blur the boundaries between work and non-work tasks, especially with provisions like flexible work hours, telecommuting (working from home), and others. Gadgets enable us to work from our cars and homes, from planes and cafes—places that used to be traditionally non-work spaces. On the flip side, employees can bring personal activities (e.g. texting, online shopping, logging in to social media accounts) into the workplace. This blurring of boundaries leads to work hours spilling over into non-work hours, and vice-versa, causing imbalance and conflict between the two.

 

Ways to Have Work-Life Balance

It can be challenging to achieve a proper work-life balance given our numerous roles and responsibilities, but there are a few strategies that may help you actualise it:

 

Organize and Prioritize

It’s best to start with tracking your daily activities and estimating how much time is dedicated to each. Afterwards, try to prioritise: what’s non-negotiable, what can be flexible, and what’s not really important? Whether it’s cooking dinner for your kids, or working on your board presentation, or having a date night once a week—it will be an eye-opener on what really matters to you.

Check if your non-negotiables are mostly personal commitments or professional ones, or more or less an equal mix of the two. This will show you whether the hours spent between these two facets are uneven and if they in fact spill over into each other. Here you can already start the process of balancing your hours for a more even distribution of time and effort.

 

Segment, Multitask, and Neglect

It’s a cause for concern when work and personal roles begin to overlap, because one role could either benefit or harm the other, and most of us can only juggle so much before reaching the breaking point. It pays to set firmer boundaries between work and non-work activities, or what we refer to as “segmenting.”

This is particularly difficult to do in our digital age when technology blurs boundaries. But with a little effort, it can be done. Segment when you’re engaging in non-negotiable activities: pay attention during an important meeting, be fully present when playing with your kids, and don’t check your phone every five seconds when you’re out with friends.

Now for tasks that you’ve deemed flexible (e.g., cleaning the house, watching a new TV series, picking your kid up from practice) you can actually multitask while doing these activities, or even occasionally neglect them. It’s all about prioritizing: neglect what you can, multitask when you can, and segment what you love.

 

Take Care of Yourself

Work-life balance isn’t just about figuring out how to best be of service to other people, it means figuring out how to best care for yourself. Set aside your own me-time every day when you can recharge through simple activities like reading, exercising, pampering, satisfying a food craving, or just plain relaxing. It’s not about being vain — you need to be healthy and happy to be able to give your best at work and at home.

Work-life balance is strongly associated with health, wellbeing, and personal and professional relationships. Prioritizing work and non-work demands may not always be easy, but with a lot of planning, consideration, and zero guilt, you can determine what matters most to you and strike that perfect balance between work and play

 

Who is the author?

Daniel Ross is part of the marketing team at Roubler — a time and attendance software platform founded in Australia. Their mission is to change the way the world manages its workforces.

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Aviation skills: Do you have what it takes?

Aviation skills: Do you have what it takes?

For any job, you will be required to have certain relevant skills, and the world of aviation is no exception. In fact, lacking some of these skills could make all the difference in a life and death situation.

In the modern world of recruitment, professional skill sets are just as important as any qualifications or experience as they are vital to the candidate’s success within their role.

Speaking at the UK’s Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), Matthew Hancock claimed that today’s employers struggled to find employees as the skills system lacked ‘rigour and responsiveness.’

So if you’re thinking about joining the aviation industry, or wanting to climb the career ladder, here are 7 essential skills that every aviation professional needs to brush up on.

 

Communication skills

It’s fairly obvious that aviation professionals need to have exceptional communication skills during normal flight conditions and in emergency situations.

Poor communication has previously been cited as a factor for accidents, such as the Tenerife airport disaster of 1977 whereby two planes collided on the runway, killing 583 people. The KLM captain mistakenly believed that air traffic control had issued him clearance to take off. The plane thus went on to collide with a Pan Am plane which was awaiting takeoff in foggy conditions.  

 

Analysing and evaluating skills

Being able to evaluate information to establish certain facts and principles are key strengths for anyone within the aviation industry. Though tragic, the Tenerife airport disaster did lead experts on to review all their procedures, including the importance of standardized phraseology in radio communications being emphasised.

On a day to day basis, pilots are faced with many split-second decisions that can affect the fate of everyone on board. For example, by analysing a change in weather conditions, they can then react accordingly via their training and experience.

 

Interpersonal & sensitivity skills

Interpersonal skills also include effective communication skills, whether it be a simple or complex message. The importance of effective communication is of particular importance due to the level of responsibility of human life and the continual shift towards automated procedures.

Also known as ‘emotional intelligence,’ interpersonal sensitivity is the ability to respect and being open to another person’s viewpoint. It has fast become one of the most important skills of the 21st century and is highly sought after in leadership positions.  

 

Teamwork skills

Working as part of a team is a vital skill needed in most professions. Being a good team player requires cooperation, patience, identifying common goals and working collaboratively towards them. When you’re flying the skies, it’s vital that the whole team cooperate together to ensure a safe journey for everyone.

It’s also important to accept responsibility for your failings within a team setup. During flight training, students are actively encouraged to take responsibility for their actions and decisions.    

 

Global skills

Working in the aviation industry will bring you into direct contact with different ethnic backgrounds from around the world, so global skills are absolutely essential. Having an awareness and understanding of different cultural viewpoints and communicating respectfully will give you a significant competitive edge in the aviation job market.

Whilst flying as a First Officer in Greece, Marcus Lindblom tried to notify the ground crew that he required 5 tons of fuel by signalling with his whole hand (one finger for each ton required) with his palm facing forward.

However, in Greece, this is deemed as a rude gesture which resulted in the ground handler denying his request and looking the other way. Fortunately, the Captain had experienced this before and advised Lindblom accordingly. This example just goes to show how essential global skills really are.  

 

Flexibility skills

For any business to grow, it needs to change and evolve. The future of aviation is expected to be turbulent with a new wave of technological innovation and changes in geopolitics. The UK leaving the European Union, for instance, will have a significant impact on previously agreed legislations between countries.  

A report by Right Management found that 91% of hiring managers will only recruit on the candidate’s ability to deal with change and uncertainty.

 

Time management skills

Time management skills are exceptionally important to airlines that are measured by their On-Time performance. Any delay caused to a flight is a waste of valuable resources and may cost the airline in fines. An airline that has a bad reputation for always being delayed or causing passengers to miss connecting flights may result in a loss of business as passengers seek to fly with a more reliable airline. Thus, time management skills in their workforce are of paramount importance.

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Should you use social media in your job search?

Should you use social media in your job search?

You should use every tool at your disposal to help you in your job search and social media is no exception. In our ever more interconnected and online world, social media platforms are increasingly being used both by jobseekers to find opportunities and recruiters to track down great candidates. Your online presence is becoming just as important as face-to-face networking and speculative applications.

Recruiters are more social-media savvy than ever and are increasingly taking to platforms such as LinkedIn and Facebook to find those top candidates. You should do everything you can to make it easier for these recruiters to find you and get in touch. Get yourself noticed by prospective employers by engaging with them online and you’ll be at the front of the queue when a new role becomes available.

Many aviation employers are starting to realise that they need to start employing new tactics to attract candidates to their job vacancies and utilising social media for this is just part of that. In an industry plagued with pilot shortages, social media is key to a long term hiring strategy of building great brand awareness.

 

Which social media platforms should you use in your job search?

Your first point of call should usually be LinkedIn. A recent survey of recruiters carried out by Right Management found that LinkedIn was the most favoured platform.

“It’s critical, particularly in this difficult job market, that job seekers develop the right skills and have access to the right opportunities to find employment. It’s never been more important to learn how to effectively network with peers – online and offline – as well as being able to create a great online profile with compelling messaging that will get noticed by employers and recruiters. It’s not enough to just have a good CV today” – Nicola Deas, practice leader of career management at Right Management

However, you shouldn’t write other social media platforms off. Right Management’s survey found that 52% of recruiters also use Facebook to hunt down suitable candidates. The shows just how important it is for jobseekers to have professional profiles across all of their social media profiles.

You might also want to take into account the rise of mobile browsing. Recruiters are catching onto this and alerts can be set up on your smartphone so you know the moment a new job has been posted.

Social media hasn’t replaced the more traditional means of applying for jobs, however, making use of your online network is a no-brainer. Your online profiles can become excellent tools to help you stand out in a competitive jobs market, demonstrate your passion for the aviation industry and connect with others in the industry.

 

How to use social media in your job search

Here are four tips to get you well on your way to creating a professional online presence.

1. Show off your skills on LinkedIn

You’ll find that most major aviation employers have a profile on LinkedIn. Whether you’re interested in working for easyJet, British Airways or Emirates, there are connections to be made via this fast-growing professional networking site.

Remember that recruiters are keen to make the most of tools like LinkedIn which allow them to effectively search for aviation and engineering professionals for free, cutting costs in the expensive recruitment process.

The first thing to do is to make sure your profile is up to scratch. Add a professional profile picture and add your qualifications and experience. Get colleagues to endorse your skills and make sure you’re using the keywords that will catch recruiters’ eyes.

Add your contacts to make sure that you’re as widely connected as possible. However, you might want to be wary of revealing to your current employer how much effort you’re putting into your profile.

As well as allowing you to show off your skills and experience on your profile, and engage with relevant profiles and posts, LinkedIn also lists jobs.

For some people, it might be worth spending some money and upgrading to a premium account. You’ll be able to see who is interested in your profile and get relevant job alerts.

Once you’re set up, don’t just leave it to work its magic. Start engaging with other aviation professionals, employers and recruiters. Demonstrate your passion for the industry and get involved in discussions and post industry news.

2. Fix your Facebook profile

As we’ve already mentioned, recruiters also use Facebook to find suitable candidates. They might also use Facebook to screen applicants they’ve already found. In fact, a recent survey found that 70% of employers use social media screening before hiring applicants.

With this in mind, it’s really important that your online profiles are suitable for potential employers to see. Make sure you remove any questionable photos or posts that might make an employer think twice about employing you. You could also ramp up your privacy settings if you’d rather they can’t see anything on your profile.

Make sure you Google your name and take a look at the results as this is a really simple check that a recruiter might do before contacting an applicant. Check the images that appear too. You could also use a social media screening tool yourself to see what a recruiter might pick up if they searched for you. However, the best approach is to clean up your profiles manually.

You could employ a similar tactic as on LinkedIn with your Facebook account and start posting industry news and get involved with the latest discussions concerning the aviation industry if you wanted to stand out to recruiters.

3. Get Tweeting

Twitter is a great tool that will allow you to connect directly with recruiters and employers and get yourself on their radar. It’s now common for employers to tweet job opportunities, so it’s worth following the companies that you’d like to work for to be the first in the know.

Make sure your profile is up to scratch and get involved with the aviation community on Twitter.

You might want to try a tool like Tweetdeck that has an impressive search function and you can set up feeds for different accounts and hashtags, making sure you don’t miss the most important tweets.

4. Start a blog

If you want to really impress recruiters, you could try starting your own website based on your personal areas of interest in the industry. Use your social profiles to promote what you’ve created and make your voice heard amongst other aviation professionals.

Recruiters are also on the lookout for some of the personality traits required to regularly contribute to a blog or website. It’s generally a sign that someone is passionate, committed and tenacious – which all add up to a hard-working employee.

 

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How to answer ‘What can you bring to this role?’

How to answer ‘What can you bring to this role?’

One of the questions you should come to interviews prepared to answer is ‘What can you bring to this role?’ Having a clear idea in your mind as to exactly what you and your unique skill set would add to the role will put you in a great position to come up with great answers to other questions too.

This question sets you up perfectly to show off your relevant skills, experience and how they will help you in the role in question. It is also your chance to explain what you can offer that other applicants can’t.

This is a common interview question that you will be expected to answer well. Failure to prepare will make it seem as though you aren’t committed to the role. If you do prepare and are able to deliver a great answer in your interview, this could be your key to your dream job.

 

How to prepare your answer to ‘What can you bring to the role?’

Research is key:

Make sure you start your preparation well in advance. The best place to start your research for this question is the job description and the company’s website. Pick out the most important skills or experience listed on the job description. Then see if you can find the company’s values on their website as this will give you some clues as to the type of person they’re looking for.

Once you have this information, cross-reference it with your own skills and experience on your CV and your own personal values. This will form the basis for your answer.

 

Give examples:

The most convincing answers will include examples. Don’t simply state that you have the required skills, demonstrate that you have by describing a time you had to put them into practice.

 

Have backup:

We recommend that you prepare at least three key attributes that will demonstrate what you’ll bring to the role. Each of these should be central to the role in question and you should be able to back it up with an example. You should only need to talk about one or two of these attributes, but it’s always good to have a couple of extras up your sleeve in case you are pushed for more detail.

The following examples should help you prepare some great answers.

 

The ability to deal with time pressure and meeting deadlines

“Due to my previous experience in a similar role at X, I know that this role will involve meeting tight deadlines. I developed the ability to do this in my last job and am comfortable working on several projects simultaneously while still meeting deadlines.

For example, I needed to ensure that I didn’t fall behind on my administrative duties even when we had a particularly busy period making repairs. Efficiently recording the work that had been completed was central to the organisation of the whole team. In order to make this process more efficient, I would make brief notes during the day which sped up the admin tasks considerably and made sure I met deadlines.”

Why we like this answer: This candidate has identified a key attribute from their own experience. This is likely to convince interviewers that they know what they’re talking about and are aware of the challenges they will face in the role. The extra detail as to how they were proactive in getting organised reinforces this.

 

Teamwork

“I can see from the job description that this role will require a lot of teamwork. I love being part of a team and I think that my communication skills add a lot of value here. During my work for X, I was working with offices in different parts of the world. This meant that communication was essential when working on projects together. I set up weekly meetings via Skype which had a set agenda so we could make sure that everybody was on the same page in an efficient way. This extra communication added to the team dynamic, despite us working in different offices in different parts of the world.”

Why we like this example: This candidate has explained exactly what it is that makes them such an effective team player. Communication skills are essential in almost any job so this is a great example to go for. The example they have chosen demonstrates that they understand the essentials of good teamwork.

 

These examples give you an idea of how long you might want your answer to be. They are detailed, giving examples, yet they’re concise.

When you practice, make sure you aren’t tempted to script your answers word-for-word. This can make your answer sound a little robotic or unnatural and might not fit with the natural flow of the conversation. Instead, prepare your answer as bullet points as this gives you a room to manoeuvre.

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