Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.

 

Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10 as a co-pilot and 20 as Captain.) Did you always want to be a pilot?

Yes, I became interested about the age of 13. I got a flying lesson for my 14th birthday and from that day onwards I only had one goal. From a very young age, I thought I wanted to be an air hostess. I met two pilots from Aer Lingus and told them that, and they asked why I didn’t want to be a pilot. I replied, ‘because I’m a girl!’, and they were like, ‘so…?’ So that got me thinking.

 

What do you love about the job?

My job affords me the opportunity to do what I love, my hobby on a professional level and get paid for it. Every day is different, and after 30 years I still get a buzz.

 

What’s the hardest part about the job?

The hardest part is probably the shift work, the irregular lifestyle and jet lag can play havoc with your sleep patterns – but I get to see the sun above the clouds every time I go to work, no matter what the weather’s like in Dublin, and that’s a real privilege.

 

If you weren’t a pilot, what profession do you think you’d be in?

To be honest, I’ve no idea. I’ve been flying commercially for 30 years. Throughout my career I’ve gained many useful skills. I would hope I could put them to good use should I lose my license!

 

How do you manage to balance a demanding job and family life?

I am highly organised and having great support at home is key. My husband Fergal is great, and we have a fantastic childminder who works around my roster.

 

Amazingly, there are only around 7,500 female airline pilots in the world, and until a few years ago, you could have fit all the female captains in the world on a 450 seater A380. How does that make you feel to be part of such an elite club?

I joined Aer Lingus in 1988, I was the 4th female employed. As aviation for women was still relatively new back then, I had the privilege of being involved in the 1st all female crew with our first female Captain Grainne Cronin. I was also the first Irish female to be licensed on a 4 engine jet. At the time you take these things in your stride, but as I get older, I’m very proud to be able to tell my children.

 

Why do you think it is such a male dominated industry?

Aviation is just over 100 years old. Up until the ‘70’s very few women worked outside the home. Yes there is still some gender bias but that is changing. Women have proven themselves and companies are actively employing them.

 

After passing your ATPL, how long did it take you to find a job, apply for it and complete the interview process?

In the late ‘80’s there was a downturn in the industry. After my exams it took me a number of months to find a job. But once employed, I was flying within 6 weeks.

 

What advice would you give to any young girls who are aspiring pilots?

I think the advice I’d give would apply to any young person that wants to fly. Believe in yourself, work hard and never give up.

 

Would you encourage your children to become pilots?

I would encourage anybody to follow your dreams. Flying tends to be a career that you’re passionate about and not easily deterred.

 

Lastly, Brexit is the topic of the decade. Are you concerned about how it will affect the aviation industry?

The aviation industry is well used to change. After the horrific events of September ‘11, the industry adapted as it will with whatever Brexit throws up.

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.   Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10...

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots. I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience. A first solo flight can seem...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from - long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both. Life as a...

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots.

I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience.

A first solo flight can seem intimidating to beginners, but it is a flight you will always remember. The process will be along the same lines for most students getting their private license. Even if you’re going all the way to your commercial pilot licence, a first solo is pretty much the same for everyone.

I had a bit of a mess around with my class 1 aviation medical, which was issued over a month late. It wasn’t the end of the world, though it heightened the anticipation for my “big day”.

Requirements for student pilots to go solo in Australia can be found on the CASA website

 

Dual Check Before Your First Solo Flight

The very next morning after receiving my medical, I booked in my dual check so an instructor could send me solo.

Dual checks are a simple enough process where your instructor sits in while you do an hour of circuits.

I performed some flapless landings; glide approaches; go-arounds and the usual tricks. After some minor critiquing and basic advice, we came into land.

I don’t know what on earth gave me this impression, but I was under the firm belief that we’d go inside and sort out some paperwork. I’d then be able to enjoy a quick cup of tea before going out for my very first solo flight.

Turns out, that’s not how it works.

As I was taxiing back to the ramp area, the instructor asked me to stop so that he could jump out. That’s when I realised I was on my own.

 

Sending It: Your First Solo Flight

I wasn’t afraid, but there was certainly a great amount of trepidation. Ultimately it came down to excitement and I knew I had to get on with it.

I took my time to go through all my run up checks once more. I made my first solo radio call announcing that I was taxiing, and even that basic feat was exciting.

Sitting at the hold point and waiting for other traffic to land was exciting. I waited patiently, knowing that I would commit myself as soon as I entered and backtracked the runway.

“Whiskey Oscar Juliet is entering and backtracking runway two five for circuits”

Almost there…

“Compass and DG aligned”, saying out loud to nobody.

 

Now or never.

 

“Throttle in, airspeed coming alive, temperatures and pressures in the green” I said once more to no one.

Rotate speed. I knew this was the moment I would become a real pilot. Or die…

And then it happens, that sweet, juicy moment when you’re flying a plane all by yourself and you’re in the sky.

 

I concentrated only on flying until I was at 300 feet, ran through a take-off safety checklist quickly and then took a very brief moment to take in my surroundings.

I’ll admit, a “F… Yeah!” loudly found it’s way out of my mouth and I was now loving every second of it.

From then on, it was a process of going through my usual checklists and clearing turns. I focused on balancing my concentration between instruments and the outside, while keeping a listening watch on the radio.

 

Downwind…

 

Base…

 

Final…

 

 

To me – though I’m sure it differs from pilot to pilot – it was a matter of consciously not overthinking it. I was holding a slight amount of drift against the small crosswind and heading straight for the centreline. The threshold was maintaining its location in my viewpoint and I kept checking my airspeed.

I rounded out a little early, knowing that if I was going to be too low when rounding out, that nobody would point it out. I guess I was subconsciously compensating.

What a ride. I rolled through, cleared the runway and went through the after landing checks.

 

After the Flight

I was feeling pretty buzzed when I taxied back and my instructor and some mates met me out at the hangar. It was cool to finally be a part of the club.

I conducted all my training up to that point, in a Cessna 172. I’m too tall for a 152 and have never flown one, so I felt pretty cool about doing my first solo flight in a 172, while all my mates were still in baby planes.

 

Final Tips

There’s no real secret about what to do in your first solo. My only bit of advice would be to turn the intercom on, even though there’s no one else to talk to.

By having it on, you’ll be able to hear your own voice when going through your checklists aloud. It’s a bit disconcerting to hear your own voice normally, and then for it to disappear as soon as you’re flying alone. Speaking your way through your checklists are an important way of keeping the environment similar to what you’re used to when flying dual.

So there it is: It’s exciting, intimidating and one hell of a rush.

 

About the Author

Toby holds a commercial pilot license and is a perpetual thrill seeker.

If you can’t find him riding a motorbike through the Atacama Desert on a magazine article assignment, he’ll be on a tropical beach writing articles to pay for his “beautifully self-indulgent lifestyle” that he likes to brag about.

 

You can find more chronicles of his adventures over on his blog Travelling Minimalist

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.   Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10...

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots. I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience. A first solo flight can seem...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from - long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both. Life as a...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from – long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both.

Life as a short haul pilot

More often than not, a pilot’s first commercial job will be flying short haul to destinations within Europe. Not many British airlines do nightstops in Europe so a typical day will consist of 2 – 6 return trips, dependent on the time to reach the destination. Work patterns like this will often be in blocks between 4 and 6 days, with a few days rest between blocks. There are time limits on what is legally acceptable – and safe – for pilots to fly, so this will all be factored into the rota. Flying short haul will help a newly qualified pilot learn a lot quicker as the pilot will be performing more take offs and landings in one day than a long haul pilot would perform in a month. Pilots will also become more familiar with airports, their layout and operations by continually flying in and out of them. Working short haul does require stamina, especially in the early days when you’re trying to adapt to a new work pattern. If you’re on ‘earlies,’ you can expect to be waking up around 4am to arrive at the airport around 6am – no problem if you’re an early bird, but for some, trying to convince your body to sleep earlier than normal is challenging. A normal day would commence with a briefing, which would study the route, an alternative route, the destination’s weather and suitable bolt-holes along the way. Other factors looked at during the brief would be weights, loads, flight times, slot delays and any technical defects known to the aircraft. A decision on how much fuel is required will be made from the given information, and then the pilot (and cabin crew) will make their way to the aircraft. Once on board, the pilot will commence extensive pre-flight checks. A commercial pilot’s main job is to connect passengers safely from A to B. However, airlines are providing customers with a service, so if the aircraft is held up for any reason, it is up to the staff to collectively resolve it quickly. An airline with a bad reputation for cancelling or delaying flights will run the risk of customers opting for a more reliable airline. Turnaround times between flights are short, sometimes as little as 25 minutes, so there is scarce time for breaks. Also, if one of your earlier flights gets delayed for whatever reason, you will spend the whole day trying to catch up. Meal times will also be sporadic and unstructured to what constitutes a normal eating pattern. However, one big plus of flying short haul is that you get to sleep in your own bed every night, and your body clock shouldn’t alter too much. This works well for pilots with young families as theoretically, you should be more refreshed (i.e. no jet lag) during your days off.  Also, if you work for a leisure or holiday airline, you can expect to be busier in the summer months as people look to jet off on holiday, and less so in winter. While flying in Europe is physically demanding, it is considered to be very satisfying. While you might not get to see more than the runway or airport, usually the standards are much higher compared to other destinations in the world.  

What about long haul?

While there are some similarities between a long and short haul pilot, the pace of flying long haul is very different as everything takes a little longer. Briefings will take longer as pilots have a longer flight route to load, they have to take into account more weather scenarios and seek out more diversion routes along the way. Once airborne, pilots could still be loading ancillary data such as wind speeds, directions, distances and getting oceanic clearance (if you’re heading that way) for the first hour of the flight. Then, throughout the flight, pilots would need to make periodic checks of routes, timings, fuel quantity and temperatures.   London based captain, Nick Anderson, noted that a plane could pass through three or four weather systems, varying in type, intensity, and level of difficulty on one flight. He said, “Weather is a huge problem for us on the long flights.” He continued, “You can’t really sit back and relax. Going as fast as we are, you come upon these weather systems very, very quickly. We give thunderstorms a wide berth, and that requires traffic clearance.” Similar to short haul, long haul pilots are required to turn up for work fit and well rested. Fatigue is a big issue and many airlines will carry an additional pilot on longer international flights, so they have a fully alert operating crew at all times. Having an alert pilot is particularly crucial when landing in busy airfields such as New York or Sydney, as full concentration is required. Long haul pilots will typically be away from home for a few days at a time, but with considerable time off between flights. Under EASA regulations, some destinations that have bigger time differences will require four local nights back at home so the pilot can re-adjust to the time zone before reporting for duty again. All pilots have a maximum monthly and yearly hour limitation on how many hours they can fly; a long haul pilot will usually reach their maximum hours much quicker than a short haul pilot. Unlike short haul, long haul pilots will get to see some of the destinations they fly to, which can be a huge bonus, dependant on your home situation. However, while you’re visiting amazing places and indulging in new experiences, you’ll be doing it miles away from your family and friends, which for some pilots isn’t worth the compromise. On asked which he prefered, Pilot, Dave Inch, said, “Different flying is like different flavors of ice cream. Everybody has a favorite – and often it depends on what’s happening in your life.”

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.   Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10...

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots. I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience. A first solo flight can seem...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from - long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both. Life as a...

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.

Ryanair launches new pilot training scheme

Ryanair launches new pilot training scheme

This week, Ryanair announced a new pilot training partnership with Cork-based international flight school, Atlantic Flight Training Academy (AFTA.) An Tánaiste, Simon Coveney, launched the partnership which will create 50 new jobs and facilitate Ryanair’s continued growth across Europe.

Coveney said, “Ryanair is one of Ireland’s world class business successes and this announcement confirming the next generation of Ryanair pilots will be trained in Cork is a most welcome one. I hope many will be based in Cork when they qualify to fly on the new routes announced from Cork Airport.”

“Ryanair is one of Ireland’s world class business successes.”

The new 16 month programme will give trainee pilots a structured path to achieving their pilot licence, in the expectation that they will be ready to join the Ryanair Boeing 737 type-rating programme when they have completed it.

The trainees will be trained by AFTA instructors (using Ryanair procedures) who are cementing their status as a leading provider of pilot training programmes. AFTA are expected to recruit and train up to 450 pilots in the next five years.   

Coveney continued, “Atlantic Flight Training Academy has also established itself as an industry leader in training and this announcement confirms that. Finally, to the 450 trainees who will launch their careers from here, I wish you every success.”

Ryanair Chief Marketing, Kenny Jacobs, said, “Ryanair is pleased to announce this training partnership with AFTA which has an impressive track record in training top class pilots to the highest standards.”

He continued, “We are also launching our Cork summer 2019 schedule, our biggest ever, with 16 routes including four exciting new routes to Budapest, London Luton, Malta and Poznan, further cementing our commitment to Cork and the Munster region.”

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.   Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10...

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots. I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience. A first solo flight can seem...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from - long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both. Life as a...

Powering up the employee experience for customer experience to take flight

Powering up the employee experience for customer experience to take flight

Ahead of the Aviation Festival in London, we caught up with Darko Todorovic to see why he suggests that airlines need to power up the employee experience for customer experience to take flight.  

 

Darko, just briefly, please introduce yourself

With more than 20 years’ experience in the airline industry, I now serve as the Airline Passenger Business Lead at Unisys. I am involved in extensive client advisory activities, creation of new industry solutions, and execution of the company’s strategic vision for travel and transportation business. My responsibilities include identifying social, mobile, analytics and cloud benefits to the travel and transportation business, bringing digital transformation solutions to the travel industry.

How adaptive are airlines to new technology?

Airlines will always continue to operate in technically high-end environments, adopting key technologies, such as sophisticated revenue management techniques, much sooner than other mainstream businesses. Airlines are exposed to extremely strong competition, not only from inside their own industry but from other modes of transport also. On top of that, when it comes to “who owns the customer” issue, airlines have to deal with global digital gatekeepers. I would say that the airlines are very proactive when they define their future and the technology that can enable that vision.

How effective are new technologies rolled out across airlines?

New technologies are very effective and can be extremely well targeted to achieve their core operating goals – such as, improved customer experience, personalisation, automation, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, better revenue management and cost control. In my experience, rolling out new technologies echoes the approach, standards and quality of that of the avionics equipment employed, with highly professional ‘heavy duty’ delivery via the airlines own staff and their solution and technology partners.

 

How do new technologies (implemented by airlines) affect employees in the long and short term?  

New technologies help to limit friction with customers, for example improving the baggage handling process or reducing flight delays, which would in turn positively impact the working environment. Any change does need to be approached in a sensitive manner however, allowing employees to gear the best outcome for the airline, and ensure an optimum work/life balance.

 

Can you give any examples of where a new technology has benefited employees and their day to day job?

The Internet of things (IoT) has found its place at the airports, in supply chain and cargo operations, and even in passenger cabins. Also, down in data centres we can find extensive data analytics and artificial intelligence. All these technologies enable use cases that were not possible before. They are dramatically empowering the employees to do their work in new ways and serve their customers and businesses much differently than in the past.

 

How about when new technologies fail, what kind of impact does that have on employees who still have to manage their day around it? And when a technology fails, what can employees do to ensure that the customer experience isn’t affected?

I remember the days when the airlines introduced automation into previously manual processes. At that time, the airline workforce was over-dimensioned and very knowledgeable of each step in the process. Failing technology was not an issue – airline staff could revert back to their manual procedures. These days are gone. Digitisation and passenger self-service capabilities dramatically reduced the size of airlines’ staff and also their training needs. Unfortunately, there is little an employee can do when the technology fails. Empathy and assertiveness with the customers are the employee’s best option.

 

In terms of revenue, what kind of impact can a fail in technology cause?

Financial impact can be quite dramatic – imagine a failure that prevents an airline to fly and forces it to leave their passengers on the ground. Sounds familiar, right? A single point of failure in very complex airline systems can lead to this situation. The estimated cost impact is typically hundreds of millions of USD in lost revenue and incurred costs to the airline. Even less dramatic events can have a significant impact. In case an airline’s e-commerce platform slows down, the passengers may not be willing to wait and would just decide to buy their tickets with another airline. When that happens, the airline’s sophisticated revenue optimisation strategies stop to work, resulting in the loss of sales.

 

The saying goes ‘a bad workman blames his tools.’ Is this true, or are their ways and means around failures in technology?

In highly automated airline and airport environments, the technology plays the main role. By design, the role of technology cannot be replaced by the workforce. Modern, digital companies must ensure that they have backup solutions in place for their critical systems. It is important to eliminate that single point of failure in the systems. It can be done in different ways. Currently we are interested in functional backups, enabling process execution on a different, shared infrastructure.

In a nutshell, how would you suggest that airlines “power up the employee experience for customer experience to take flight? Provide smart and timely fixes to the technology the employee uses on a day-by-day basis that fits around their need. In a modern enterprise, employees are valued internal customers of the business. Employee’s positive experience with the technology and processes design is key for the successful service of the airlines’ or airports’ end customers – their passengers.

Can you tell us a little more about the upcoming workshop at the Aviation Festival in September, and what attendees can expect?

Without giving too much away, we anticipate a lively and energised, interactive discussion around the needs and desires of often unseen heroes of the industry – the airline and airport staff that labour tirelessly to help us, as travellers, to depart, travel and arrive at our destination, relaxed, happy and ready for action.

You can see Darko Todorovic, and the Vice President and Global Head of Travel and Transportation, Dheeraj Kohli, in action at the Aviation Festival London on the 5th – 7th September 2018. 

During the conference Darko and Dheeraj will discuss how airlines and airports are digging deep into how to create an exceptional customer experience. However, to deliver the customer experience that customers want, it is vital to also deliver the employee experience that your staff is craving. In Unisys’ collaborative workshop, attendees will discover the implications of workplace technology, discuss what it means to be a technology leader or laggard, and will be able to get involved in interactive demos of innovative technologies. To book your tickets, visit here now.

Who is Darko Todorovic?

Darko Todorovic serves as the Airline Passenger Business Lead at Unisys. In this capacity, he is involved in extensive client advisory activities, creation of new industry solutions and execution of the company’s strategic vision for travel and transportation business.

About Unisys

Unisys is a global information technology company that specialises in providing industry-focused solutions integrated with leading-edge security to clients in the government, financial services and commercial markets. Unisys offerings include security solutions, advanced data analytics, cloud and infrastructure services, application services and application and server software.

Who are we?

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.

Gain experience and soar

Gain experience and soar

Are you a student or recent graduate and wondering about where your future is heading?

Knowing exactly what you want to do and where you want to work can seem daunting early on in your career. However, fear not as help could be at hand. Work experience is one of the best ways to find out more about the number of different paths available to you, along with being a great platform for building great contacts and expanding your CV.

While it may not be as simple as picking up the phone and bagging work experience, there are a number of ways you can develop your experience, and here’s our top 5 ways how.

 

Internships and Work Placements

Internships can take many forms, from one-year ‘sandwich’ placements, usually aimed at undergraduate university students who have completed two years of their degree (sometimes after year three if on an MEng programme) to summer placements. Bigger companies will often follow similar application patterns as graduate employment schemes, with online application forms which open at the start of the Autumn, and close at the end.

However, if you approach smaller companies, they may be more flexible on their application dates. Ensure to enrol with the careers service so you can be updated with all the latest opportunities as they become available.

If you fancy taking the bull by the horns, you could always apply for an internship or work placement to a company that isn’t advertising for someone. Your enthusiasm will make you stand out, and it might just convince them to take a chance on you.

Another way of getting experience is suggesting that could provide assistance during the summer months – a time when a lot of staff will typically be off on their annual leave.  

 

Volunteer

Aviation is a natural passion for many people, particularly the history of aviation. Up and down the UK, there are many aviation heritage museums which you could be a part of. Look out for the chance to volunteer in any aircraft restoration projects as they are great ways of developing your teamwork and project management skills – all which will look great on your CV.

We recommend you take a look at the Farnborough Air Sciences Trust, the Imperial War Museum, the Jet Age Museum and the Yorkshire Air Museum.

 

Competitions

You have to be in it to win it! There are numerous competitions on and offline which you could take part in – and some with fantastic prizes! We recommend the Flying Start Challenge. Even if you don’t win, just taking part shows great enthusiasm and innovation. Plus you never know who you’ll meet along the way!

 

Join a club

Air safety is of paramount importance in aviation and aerospace, so developing that mindset early on will only serve you well later on in your career. Accessing placements with airlines and airports can be tricky due to restrictions on security and age. However, by joining a flying club, you’ll be able to connect with thousands of other individuals who fly as a hobby. There are many aerodromes in the UK with flying clubs, all which could potentially give you experience and insight you’re looking for. Furthermore, look out for aerodromes that are close to major airports or aviation manufacturers as you may make some useful connections with other members of the club. Many people who work in the industry fly as a hobby, but not commercially. You never know who you might get chatting to!

 

When all else fails

Don’t be disheartened if you feel like none of these are working out for you. Even working or volunteering for a company outside of the aviation industry can help you to develop your skills – all which can be transferable once the opportunity arises.

Employers want to see that you can not only do a job, but that you’ll fit in with the team, that you can work independently and responsibly. You can show these skills in any job so don’t be afraid to showcase what you’ve learnt when you need to.  

Inside the life of a female commercial Captain

We recently caught up with Aer Lingus Captain, Elaine Egan, to talk about being in an elite club of female captains, what she loves about her job, and the topic of much discussion, what she thinks about Brexit.   Firstly, you’ve been a pilot for over 30 years now (10...

Toby Richardson: What to Expect From Your First Solo Flight

Your first solo flight. It’s a hot topic among new student pilots. I found myself being quizzed by a few of the newer students when I was doing my training and thought it might be worth writing about the experience. A first solo flight can seem...

Life as a pilot: Long haul vs short haul

If you’re thinking of becoming a pilot, or are due to gain your ATPL soon, there are two main options that a commercial pilot can choose from - long or short haul, but what’s the difference? Here’s our simple rundown of the main differences between both. Life as a...

Who are we?

 

We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.