Easing yourself back in to work after maternity leave

Easing yourself back in to work after maternity leave

Heading back to work from maternity leave? Rejoining the workplace after a long break can leave you riddled with anxiety!

Going back to work after maternity leave is the start of an exciting new chapter for you and your family. It’s an opportunity to rediscover yourself – the career driven you. And even if the highlight of your first day is having a cup of tea in peace (we hope), we’ve provided a few tips and answers to common questions below, that should hopefully help to ease the process of returning to work after caring for your little one.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Do I need to give my employer notice of when I will return to work?

You should have agreed a return date with your employer before you went on maternity leave, but you can always change your mind during leave. If this is the case, you will have to inform your employer 8 weeks before your proposed return date.

If you take all the maternity leave that you are legally entitled to (Ordinary Maternity Leave plus Additional Maternity Leave), you are due back to work after the end of the 52 week period. If you want to take less leave than this, you must give notice to return as you would be returning early.

 

What if my job role has changed?

Don’t assume that everything will be exactly how it was when you return back to work. Six months or a year out is a long time, and there may have been changes at work that affect your role. You have the right to return to the same job on the same terms and conditions after your maternity leave – however, sometimes it’s simply not practical to have exactly the same job.

If this is the case, your employer must offer you alternative work with the same terms and conditions as if you hadn’t been away – the terms and conditions should be as good as your previous role.

If your role has been made redundant, you should be offered a suitable alternative vacancy.

 

What about pay conditions?

You have the right to receive any pay rises or improvements in terms and conditions for your job that took place while you were on leave.

 

Am I still entitled to the same holidays?

Your holiday entitlement builds up while you are on maternity leave in the same way it would if you were at work. If you haven’t added it all to your maternity leave, you often have the right to take whatever is remaining from your annual leave.

 

Am I entitled to flexible working?

If you worked continuously for your employer for at least 26 weeks before your maternity leave, you are entitled to ask for a flexible working pattern upon your return. This can help you balance caring for your child and work. Your employer must consider your request and respond to you in writing.

Note: You have the right to ask for this, but you don’t have the right to have it.

 

What about parental leave?

If you’ve worked for your employer for more than one year, you have the right to take up to 18 weeks’ unpaid leave for each child, up to their 18th birthday in most cases.

You might take parental leave to:

  • Look at schools
  • Spend time with your child
  • Spend time visiting family
  • Settle children into new childcare arrangements

It doesn’t have to be used in one period of time, but must be in one week-long blocks, unless your child has a disability. The most each parent can take each year is up to 4 weeks per child, unless you have agreed an alternative with your employer.

 

 

 

Returning to the workplace

 

Refresh your wardrobe

You may have been sticking to comfort over style during your time off, so a refresh of your wardrobe could be the transformation you need to give your confidence a boost before you head back to work. Treat yourself to a new outfit for your first day, and take some time to revisit your pre-pregnancy outfits as an option!

 

Simulate your return to work beforehand

Have a dry run before you actually return to work so it’s not as much a shock to the system when it actually happens. Set your alarm, get up and get dressed, and test how long it takes you from childcare to work at the time you would normally do it. This helps you adjust to the likes of traffic etc. for your first day, and get a better understanding of what needs to be done before you leave for work.Trust us, you’ll feel much better on the day, knowing you’ve already done it all previously.

 

Take it easy…

Getting used to the idea of being away from your newborn isn’t easy. Diving in to the deep end could be difficult, so you do have alternatives that can help ease the process.

Use holiday accrued during your mat leave to phase a return to full time work. Maybe work two or three days a week and use your leave for the other remaining days? Try to begin your return to work mid-week so that you only have two to three days before your first weekend break. Doing this will help you look after yourself e.g. emotionally and physically, as well as being able to spend time with your child regularly.

 

Reconnect with a colleague

Call or email one of your colleagues for a chat so you can get caught up on what’s been happening while you’ve been away. Having someone there who can give you the lowdown on what’s happened is the perfect way to get back on track.

 

Try not to miss them too much

Being away from your child is hard, but try to embrace being back at work with your colleagues. You want them to see that you are happy to be back at work and are 100% committed to your job. Don’t dwell on any negative feelings you have towards being back at work, and you should be able to work through them.

 

If you would like to read a more realistic anecdote returning to work, read this. We’re sure you can relate!

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Why didn’t I get the job?

If your confidence has been knocked after receiving a rejection letter, asking for feedback can help you gain more clarity on the situation.

We’re going to walk you through how to ask an employer for feedback, so you can improve and impress at your next job interview.

 

When should you ask for feedback?

You should ask the employer  for feedback once you’ve found out that you haven’t gotten the job. If you receive a rejection email, respond within 24 hours. If it’s a phone call, ask them for feedback on the call. If you miss a call from them and they let you know via voicemail, you should call them back to ask.

 

Things you shouldn’t do

  • Don’t call outside of business hours and leave voicemails. Call during business hours so you can catch someone who can direct you to the right person.
  • Don’t call repeatedly in one day. They may never get back to you if you make yourself a nuisance to the company.
  • Apologise. If your interview was a disaster, there’s no point in saying sorry – it’s done now. Whether you had an off day or not, the moment has passed.
  • Don’t take it too hard. We all feel a bit deflated after being told we didn’t get a job we jumped through hoops for, but if you’re planning on asking for feedback, you should remain composed and respectful – don’t let your emotions take over the situation. Nothing will come from arguing, or persuading them to choose you instead. It will simply make you appear desperate. If you had a bad interview, they won’t change their minds now.
  • Don’t push back if they do give you criticism. Part of asking for feedback is accepting it and listening to it. Many employers will not offer any feedback after rejecting you, so you must appreciate that if this person does take the time out of their busy day to talk you through their reasons, it should be respected.

 

 

Things you should do

  • Appreciate the feedback they give to you – as we said earlier, not many will, so getting first-hand feedback from the person who interviewed you could be the difference between you getting another job in the near future, or making the same mistakes over and over again, sacrificing more opportunities.
  • Leave the door open. While you shouldn’t be persuading the employer to give you another chance, there is another way that you can end the call with the prospect of speaking with them again in future. Simply thank them for the opportunity and ask them to keep your application on file if anything further opens up. Something as simple as:

“I really appreciate you taking the time to talk this through with me, thank you very much for the opportunity. If in future a role crops up that you think I could be more suited to, please don’t hesitate to give me a call to discuss it.”

  • Stay positive – maybe this just wasn’t the role for you? The positives to take away from this experience include: Gaining more experience at interview stage; gaining feedback so you can improve for future interviews; knowing that you pushed yourself to go for this job, even though you may not have been ready – now hopefully, you have a better understanding of what a similar employer could be looking for.

 

 

How can I improve?

  • Listen to the feedback you receive from the employer and use it to your advantage for future opportunities. You can practice with friends or family.
  • If the feedback was based around the interview e.g. nerves, lack of confidence for the role, public speaking, general interview skills, you could start doing mock interviews with a career coach to improve. This is where you could learn that you tend to waffle, and therefore aren’t being very specific at interview stage, or you’re too modest – perhaps your answers aren’t detailed enough. There are so many things that could prove to be your shortfall in an interview – so tackle them head on.
  • Didn’t get any feedback at all? We would still suggest considering a career coach or asking a friend who had to go through extensive interviews for their job, and see if they can help you identify any flaws.
  • Use the interview tips from our career advice blog to help!

Why didn’t I get the job?

If your confidence has been knocked after receiving a rejection letter, asking for feedback can help you gain more clarity on the situation. We’re going to walk you through how to ask an employer for feedback, so you can improve and impress at your next job...

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The busy pilot’s guide to being kind to yourself

The busy pilot’s guide to being kind to yourself

We know that pilot’s face many challenges with their busy schedules. Dealing with jet lag, irregular hours and shifting routines are just some of the factors that can increase your levels of stress and tiredness. It’s really important that you focus on your physical and mental wellbeing so that you are well equipped to meet these challenges. Here are some tips to help you be kinder to yourself every day.

 

Look after your body

Being a pilot can be very demanding on your body, with the high levels of concentration required and coping with the changing time zones. It’s important to take the time to listen to your body and give it what it needs.

It can be difficult to get into a regular exercise routine that fits in with your schedule. Some people find that taking up yoga or learning some exercises with resistance bands really help. These are activities that you can practice for 15 minutes a day and can be done wherever you are, whether at home, in a gym or even in a hotel room.

Maintaining a healthy diet as a pilot isn’t easy. Forward planning and making the right choices about which foods you eat can make a huge difference to how you feel. If you eat well, you’ll find that your mood and energy levels improve. This is really important for long distance flying and maintaining concentration.

We also have a guide to help you deal with jet lag.

 

Look after your mind

It can be difficult to maintain your mental wellbeing if you’re often tired and/or stressed. Relaxation techniques or meditation might help you deal with this and ensure that you’re ready to face whatever challenges the working day holds.

There are lots of meditation apps available that can guide you through the process if you’re new to meditation and it only takes a few minutes each day. This can easily be done just before bed or when you wake up in the mornings. This can also add a bit of regular routine to your day.

If you don’t fancy giving meditation a go but still want to make more of an effort to look after your mental wellbeing, why not try writing down your thoughts to organise them better and better understand what you’re feeling and why.

 

Take a moment to look at your achievements

With a busy schedule, it can sometimes be difficult to get some perspective on what you’ve achieved. Whether these are professional or personal achievements, it’s important to take a step back and reflect on how far you’ve come. You’ll then be able to face the future and your goals with more positivity.

 

Prioritise your relationships

It can be difficult to work away from home for long periods of time and this can take a toll on your relationships. In fact, the divorce rate amongst some pilot groups is as high as 75%.

Find a little time each day to focus on these relationships. When you’re away, perhaps make a regular time to call home. When you are home, make sure you make the most of that time with your friends and family. The small things can make a big difference.

 

Be generous

Studies have shown that giving gifts is better than receiving them in terms of our own happiness. When you give something to someone, areas in your brain that are associated with social connection, trust and pleasure are activated. Scientists believe that endorphins are also released when you display altruistic behaviour.

So if you feel that you’re in need a bit of a boost, why not try giving someone an unexpected gift, just ‘because’. This can also help strengthen your relationships, as mentioned in the point above. Or maybe donate to your favourite charity.

 

Have fun

No matter how busy you are, you should still be able to find a little time in your day to do something you enjoy. It could be something as simple as watching an episode of your favourite TV show, or calling a friend, or spending some time with your kids. You might just want to kick back with a book and a glass of wine for a bit of me time.

A great way to de-stress and give yourself a boost of energy, is to find something that makes you laugh. Laughter really is the best medicine. It has been proven to boost your immune system and even help you deal with stress. It’s a great way to inject a bit more positivity into your mindset.

Easing yourself back in to work after maternity leave

Heading back to work from maternity leave? Rejoining the workplace after a long break can leave you riddled with anxiety! Going back to work after maternity leave is the start of an exciting new chapter for you and your family. It’s an opportunity to...

Why didn’t I get the job?

If your confidence has been knocked after receiving a rejection letter, asking for feedback can help you gain more clarity on the situation. We’re going to walk you through how to ask an employer for feedback, so you can improve and impress at your next job...

The busy pilot’s guide to being kind to yourself

We know that pilot’s face many challenges with their busy schedules. Dealing with jet lag, irregular hours and shifting routines are just some of the factors that can increase your levels of stress and tiredness. It’s really important that you focus on your physical...

Dealing with conflict in the workplace

Dealing with conflict in the workplace

Conflict is a given in the workplace. With so many different personalities under one roof, you’re bound to clash with someone. The way you deal with though, can affect the environment you and others work in.

Conflict can come in many forms. It can be a disagreement with how a particular process at work should play out, a personal disagreement that festers between two or more people, or it can simply be that two or more people with completely different personalities just don’t get along. Here are a few tips we’ve put together on how to deal with conflict in the office:

 

Report it

Now that you are aware of the conflict, whether it is involving you or someone else, report it. Either to your manager or if your business has one, a HR representative. The issue has to be dealt with correctly and maturely, so don’t hesitate to communicate it so that it can be resolved quickly and appropriately.

Now the conflict has been raised to the manager’s attention, the situation can be managed. If a disagreement cannot be resolved on a one to one basis, it may be better resolved in a meeting with a more senior member of your team, and those involved. Dealing with the situation head on, although awkward and uncomfortable, will create a better atmosphere in the workplace.

 

Coping Mechanisms

If the conflict involves you and is occurring on a daily basis, try some coping mechanisms  to keep yourself calm while you’re at work. If you are constantly bothered by this conflict e.g. a co-worker continuously criticises your work openly, or is difficult to communicate with, try and count to ten to calm yourself when you are feeling frustrated. Don’t react and become emotionally involved – put it to the back of your mind and try to be as professional as you can.

 

 

Improve Communication

Communication is essential within the workplace. Choosing not to improve it or adapt the way you communicate with different people could cause conflict to arise, or increase the frustration between a group of co-workers. Managers or supervisors should openly encourage communication.

 

Accept That Conflict Will Happen

No matter what job you are in or what industry it is, there will no doubt be some form of conflict. How big that conflict becomes is down to how it is handled. If the conflict is left unresolved, it can get worse. Some people believe that disagreements can lead to more drive, ambition and more creative energy – but this should be managed carefully in the event that it starts to create a negative atmosphere, ultimately affecting how the business moves forward, and how you feel about going to work every day.

 

Want more career advice? We have plenty more tips to share here.

Why didn’t I get the job?

If your confidence has been knocked after receiving a rejection letter, asking for feedback can help you gain more clarity on the situation. We’re going to walk you through how to ask an employer for feedback, so you can improve and impress at your next job...

The busy pilot’s guide to being kind to yourself

We know that pilot’s face many challenges with their busy schedules. Dealing with jet lag, irregular hours and shifting routines are just some of the factors that can increase your levels of stress and tiredness. It’s really important that you focus on your physical...

Dealing with conflict in the workplace

Conflict is a given in the workplace. With so many different personalities under one roof, you’re bound to clash with someone. The way you deal with though, can affect the environment you and others work in. Conflict can come in many forms. It can be a disagreement...

Aviation jobs salary guide 2017-18

Want to find out how much you could make working in the the aviation industry? Or what the average salary ranges for different roles are?There are a wide range of jobs in aviation, and pay varies significantly based on job title.Below, we have collected...

20 top CV tips for 2019

January is here, and there’s probably a lot going on around you at the moment - festive parties have taken their toll, and now as your company prepares to tackle 2019 with a vengeance, you might be asking yourself if you still want to be in the...

Aviation jobs salary guide 2017-18

Aviation jobs salary guide 2017-18

Want to find out how much you could make working in the the aviation industry? Or what the average salary ranges for different roles are?

There are a wide range of jobs in aviation, and pay varies significantly based on job title.

Below, we have collected data on salaries in the aviation industry, based on the job adverts we posted in 2017-18, and the comparison with 2016-17.

 

 

The table above shows that on average, the category advertising the highest paying roles was the Pilot category, with an average salary of £58,964.69. The average salary recorded for this role in 2017-18 has decreased from the previous year by 2.32% (£60,365.26).

The lowest paying role was Customer Service, at £20,757.84. This figure has decreased by 13.17% from 2016-17 (£23,906.25). 

Why didn’t I get the job?

If your confidence has been knocked after receiving a rejection letter, asking for feedback can help you gain more clarity on the situation. We’re going to walk you through how to ask an employer for feedback, so you can improve and impress at your next job...

The busy pilot’s guide to being kind to yourself

We know that pilot’s face many challenges with their busy schedules. Dealing with jet lag, irregular hours and shifting routines are just some of the factors that can increase your levels of stress and tiredness. It’s really important that you focus on your physical...

Dealing with conflict in the workplace

Conflict is a given in the workplace. With so many different personalities under one roof, you’re bound to clash with someone. The way you deal with though, can affect the environment you and others work in. Conflict can come in many forms. It can be a disagreement...

Aviation jobs salary guide 2017-18

Want to find out how much you could make working in the the aviation industry? Or what the average salary ranges for different roles are?There are a wide range of jobs in aviation, and pay varies significantly based on job title.Below, we have collected...

20 top CV tips for 2019

January is here, and there’s probably a lot going on around you at the moment - festive parties have taken their toll, and now as your company prepares to tackle 2019 with a vengeance, you might be asking yourself if you still want to be in the...

20 top CV tips for 2019

20 top CV tips for 2019

January is here, and there’s probably a lot going on around you at the moment – festive parties have taken their toll, and now as your company prepares to tackle 2019 with a vengeance, you might be asking yourself if you still want to be in the same job for the remainder of the year.

In December, we ran a survey with over 1,200 aviation jobseekers on our website, to find out if they were looking for a new job in 2019

 

  • 84% of professionals told us they were looking for a new job in 2019.
  • 72% also told us that they will be looking for a new job in January 2019.

 

Maybe you’ve been looking at other jobs for a couple of weeks now – perhaps months? You may have been stretched too thin at the time to give your CV the attention it deserves. Maybe you’ve applied for a few jobs already, but haven’t heard back?

We talked alot about ways to improve your CV in 2018, so here are a few extra tips for 2019 that you might not have thought could affect employers considering your CV.

1. Your name, professional title and contact details

Do you start your CV with the title ‘Curriculum Vitae’? Well here’s your first 2019 resolution – remove it from all future CVs. Quite simply, it’s a waste of space when the context in which someone will look at it will be that you are applying for a job anyway.

Instead, have your name, professional title (if applicable) and your contact details right at the top, so they are the first thing a recruiter will see.

 

2. Be strategic with bold, caps and italics

Make your name and job title stand out amongst other details. They don’t need to be huge, or in different colours, but you may decide to make them slightly bigger, or bold them – making your name stand out makes you more memorable – otherwise it blends in to the rest of your CV. Whichever you choose to do, be consistent e.g. if you’ve made subheadings bold, make them all bold. If you’ve used bullet points in one section, make sure the next section uses them too.

 

3. Choose an attractive, readable font

Think that because it’s a CV it all has to be in Time New Roman? Wrong. While we’d highly recommend you avoid fonts like Comic Sans, choosing a slightly different font to the norm is another way to make your CV stand out. Just be you’re picking fonts that are easy to read. For example, Verdana, Arial or Helvetica. And yes, you should definitely avoid Curlz MT.

 

4. Balance your text and white space

Just like adding margins, and creating a tidy layout, balancing your text and white space makes your CV more aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Why? Because a document with too much white space looks…empty. Don’t sacrifice all of your white space though – it still needs to look presentable as opposed to looking busy.

 

5. Identify what format works best

If everyone has the same format for their CV, it probably makes the employer’s role as a recruiter very dull…but low and behold, here is one CV that really stands out from the rest! Why? Because you formatted it differently.

Now, we’re not saying to make a complete U-turn on what the ‘typical’ CV looks like, but there are ways that you can rejig it to look slightly different. This might include:

  • Combination: This format involves putting your skills first. Skills generally tend to be a section recruiters value, as it tells them who you are as an individual in the workplace. If you are applying for a Cabin Crew role which requires excellent communication skills, then presenting this within the skills section is ideal for a recruiter to see.
  • Functional: While our research suggests that recruiters aren’t very fond of this format, if you have gaps in your CV, it could be the best option if you’re a stay-at-home mother returning to the workforce, for example. Some hiring managers see CVs like this as a red flag, so if you do go down this route, you have to make sure you can justify the gaps in your cover letter.
  • Reverse chronological work experience: This makes it easy for employers to see the pattern you’ve followed in your career e.g. did you start as a Co-pilot and work your way up to becoming Captain? Just make sure there are no gaps in your CV if you are using this format.

Another option that we have seen with graduates before, includes putting any work experience first (after contact details) to show that they have practical experience whilst being in education, which is admirable to many employers. The rest follows after this.

 

6. Consider the employer’s needs

If you think about the hundreds of CVs hiring managers have to power through, it’s natural to assume they won’t look at many of them for longer than 8 seconds – unless they see something they like. This would suggest that you don’t want your CV to be any longer than a page or two (double sided for ease) – so you should always have it in the back of your mind to make your CV as concise as possible.

 

7. Read the job description…and then read it again

According to zety.com, many of us are so geared up to start applying for the job that we may only skim over a job advert – more accurately, 76 seconds. Which is why hiring managers find that 50% of those who applied are unqualified for the job. Read it twice to make sure you are suitable for the role, and give it some thought. Is the location close enough/just right? What are the working hours like? What does it say about company culture? Don’t apply for a job because you are desperate to take the next step or find a new job. Think about whether it’s really a place or a role you could see yourself working in.

 

8. Link it all in

Today, it’s highly likely you won’t be handing your CV to an employer in person. So adapt your CV for the online world, and include links to professional social media profiles, portfolios or blogs you write for. Depending on your role, personal websites go down a real treat for potential employers – it shows them that you are passionate about something, and therefore willing to put in work to emphasise this. Even bigger props if that blog or website is applicable to the role you are applying for.

 

9. Match your cover letter to your CV

So your CV mentions that you are a creative thinker, but your cover letter doesn’t mention anything to back this up? An employer might pick up on this and feel something is missing…verification.

If you want to ensure you have a CV and cover letter that compliment each other, why not try writing your cover letter first, so that you can then break down your main points in to referenced bullet points in your work experience?  That way, you’ve covered all areas important to the employer.

 

10. Be concise

Writing a CV isn’t like writing an essay. If your CV is longer than 1 or two pages, it’s likely you’ve included information that’s not necessary (which could lose the hiring manager’s attention). Rather than writing in full sentences (unless required) bullet point your work experience to give employers a quick snapshot of what you can do. This is the easiest way to cut redundant information out of your CV.

Remember, you don’t need to list every single responsibility you had at your current or previous roles. Simply list the skills and experience that demonstrate what you need to do the job you have applied for. A big tip is to list achievements too – facts and figures will go a long way with any hiring manager.

 

 


11. Redundant jargon

Following on from our previous point, nonsensical jargon can go too…

If you work in a jargon heavy role like a B1 licensed Engineer, for example, that doesn’t necessarily mean the person hiring you understands it. Use layman’s terms or simplified equivalents where you can to avoid any confusion about your CV.

 

12. Use the upper middle area of your CV to wow recruiters

The upper-middle area of the first page of your CV is known as the ‘CV hotspot’. This is where the eye naturally falls so think about including your most important experience or ‘key attributes’ here – whether as a student it’s the work experience you’ve completed, or a s a pilot the amount of flight hours you’ve logged.

 

13. Use figures to get your point across

Bold statements about your achievements are great – but make sure you can back up what you’ve said. Figures come in really handy for this, for example, “Over 30,000 flight hours”. Any figures that can justify the work you’ve done in your current role, include them. It gives the hiring manager an idea of how effective you could be at the company they represent.

 

14. Add achievements to your experience section

If you’re currently pioneering the way for tailored CVs, adding specific achievements to your experience section will boost your tailored CV through the roof. If you can illustrate a skill of responsibility with an achievement, it puts you two steps ahead of other candidates with the same skill set.

 

15. Tailor your CV to the job description

We talk a lot about this at Aviation Job Search. That’s because your CV is your first opportunity to get your foot in the door. If recruiters can’t see the skills, experience or type of character they are looking for in your CV, it’s going straight towards the rejection section.

Need some help? Use our standout CV guide to get yours up to scratch.

 

 

16. Use tools and another person to proofread

You might consider yourself to be an excellent or poor proofreader. Whichever it is, we’d recommend you don’t take any chances in doing it yourself. Tools like Grammarly can proof your CV and provide suggestions on what should be changed. Getting a fresh pair of eyes in a friend or family member is also useful – you’d be surprised how much you could miss when you’ve spent so much time trying to perfect your CV.

 

 

17. Add a hobbies and interests section

Adding in this section shows employers you are human – that you socialise, and like to play in a team sport (so in their mind, you’re a team player?). Highlighting valuable interests and hobbies that compliment the skills relevant to your career will go down very well.

 

 

18. DO NOT LIE

It goes without saying, lying is not a great start when building a first impression. You must assume that everything on your CV will be further investigated by the hiring manager – and it could prove embarrassing in your interview if they pick up on it. It will cost you one job (maybe more), a career, and potentially a lawsuit, depending on how bad it is.

 

19. Write a thank you email

This isn’t one that gets mentioned too often, but it’s always great to acknowledge an interview after you’ve attended. Sending a post-interview thank you email is good etiquette – even if you think you aced the interview, saying thank you for even being considered is just polite.

 

20. Draw attention to any promotions

Any promotions you’ve received are essential to showing how you have progressed in your career. Under each company, section off each job role you have had there, particularly if it’s due to a promotion. For example:

Ready, Set, Go Airline –Cabin Crew member

  • Demonstrated use of emergency and safety equipment; ensured seat belts were fastened during take-off, landing and turbulence
  • Served and sold snacks, beverages and meals; coordinated meals for passengers with dietary requirements

Cabin Crew Member

  • Welcomed passengers during boarding process, checked tickets, helped them find their seats; assisted with stowing carry-on luggage
  • Educated passengers on procedures, maintained safe conditions in cabin, and helped passengers when necessary

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