10 habits of highly successful employees

10 habits of highly successful employees

Do you ever wonder how you could become more successful in your career? It’s not as difficult as you think…

Those considered successful have been practicing routine and efficient work for some time. If you’re wondering exactly what it is that successful people do that helps them to get ahead, we’ve listed just some of the habits below, that you can make a start on right now!

 

1. They think ahead

Anyone looking to get ahead will always consider the next step in their career, even while they’re in a job they are happy with. Although a focus on developing your current skills is important, many people look to gain skills that will be needed in the dream role they are working towards. It’s almost as simple as ticking boxes as you move ahead…

 

2. They socialise with everyone

Many people feel nervous around their higher ups, but it’s pretty hard to get promoted if management doesn’t know that you exist. Start building a rapport with them, produce good ideas that you can attach your name to, and just generally develop a solid working relationship. If you’re always nervous around your higher ups, you’ll never be able to present your ideas confidently to them, let alone ask them how they’re doing.

 

3. They dress to impress

We’ve all heard the saying ‘dress for the job you want’, but it really does have truth to it. People who get ahead at work take pride in how they dress and how they act. Look professional, be professional.

 

4. They jump at leadership

Anyone looking to become a success at work should want to take any opportunity to lead a team. Once you’ve mastered your area, the next step is whether you can manage others for that area. Whether it’s volunteering to train new recruits, applying to become a team leader or offering to lead a project, put your hand up and show that you can take on the responsibility.

 

5. They listen

Listening is a skill that is dreadfully overlooked. Anyone who can provide another person with their undivided attention, and show that they care and understand, and can take clear direction, is a true leader. This is a top skill employers seek, and it’s a lot harder than you think to improve.

 

6. They record their accomplishments

The most successful people can clearly show what they have delivered in their role. Keep track of data that proves you have made a difference, so that if you’re ever in question, you can present why you are a valuable asset to the company. Recording and delivering data to your higher ups is also an easy way to get noticed for your hard work.

 

7. They pitch in

Successful people want to have their voice heard, because although every idea isn’t always the best, not communicating those ideas could mean a missed opportunity. They will also get involved in the nitty gritty projects that seem worthless, but will eventually provide a more efficient process. An easy way to get ahead is to show that you have a good understanding of how everything in your department works, because you took the time to find out.

 

8. They solve problems

Have you ever just sat on a problem until it went away? Or worse, it didn’t, but you didn’t do anything to tackle it? Successful people tackle those situations head on to figure out solutions. Becoming a problem solver shows that you care – not just about your job, but about the health and ongoings of the business.

 

9. They stay informed on the business

It’s easy to shield yourself from company update emails and weekly updates, but by choosing not to read this information, you could be sacrificing your success by not staying informed on the company’s situation, successes and key talking points. Take 5 minutes out of your day to read those updates, and ask questions to show that you’re interested in how the company succeeds.

 

10. They commit to learning

Being in the same workplace environment every day can send you straight in to autopilot. Make time through your week to learn something new that could help you enhance your skillset. The most successful people are asking questions, attending conferences and courses and always working to improve themselves.

 

Want more career advice to help you get ahead? Visit our blog to hear more helpful tips and advice.

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Gain experience and soar

Gain experience and soar

Are you a student or recent graduate and wondering about where your future is heading?

Knowing exactly what you want to do and where you want to work can seem daunting early on in your career. However, fear not as help could be at hand. Work experience is one of the best ways to find out more about the number of different paths available to you, along with being a great platform for building great contacts and expanding your CV.

While it may not be as simple as picking up the phone and bagging work experience, there are a number of ways you can develop your experience, and here’s our top 5 ways how.

 

Internships and Work Placements

Internships can take many forms, from one-year ‘sandwich’ placements, usually aimed at undergraduate university students who have completed two years of their degree (sometimes after year three if on an MEng programme) to summer placements. Bigger companies will often follow similar application patterns as graduate employment schemes, with online application forms which open at the start of the Autumn, and close at the end.

However, if you approach smaller companies, they may be more flexible on their application dates. Ensure to enrol with the careers service so you can be updated with all the latest opportunities as they become available.

If you fancy taking the bull by the horns, you could always apply for an internship or work placement to a company that isn’t advertising for someone. Your enthusiasm will make you stand out, and it might just convince them to take a chance on you.

Another way of getting experience is suggesting that could provide assistance during the summer months – a time when a lot of staff will typically be off on their annual leave.  

 

Volunteer

Aviation is a natural passion for many people, particularly the history of aviation. Up and down the UK, there are many aviation heritage museums which you could be a part of. Look out for the chance to volunteer in any aircraft restoration projects as they are great ways of developing your teamwork and project management skills – all which will look great on your CV.

We recommend you take a look at the Farnborough Air Sciences Trust, the Imperial War Museum, the Jet Age Museum and the Yorkshire Air Museum.

 

Competitions

You have to be in it to win it! There are numerous competitions on and offline which you could take part in – and some with fantastic prizes! We recommend the Flying Start Challenge. Even if you don’t win, just taking part shows great enthusiasm and innovation. Plus you never know who you’ll meet along the way!

 

Join a club

Air safety is of paramount importance in aviation and aerospace, so developing that mindset early on will only serve you well later on in your career. Accessing placements with airlines and airports can be tricky due to restrictions on security and age. However, by joining a flying club, you’ll be able to connect with thousands of other individuals who fly as a hobby. There are many aerodromes in the UK with flying clubs, all which could potentially give you experience and insight you’re looking for. Furthermore, look out for aerodromes that are close to major airports or aviation manufacturers as you may make some useful connections with other members of the club. Many people who work in the industry fly as a hobby, but not commercially. You never know who you might get chatting to!

 

When all else fails

Don’t be disheartened if you feel like none of these are working out for you. Even working or volunteering for a company outside of the aviation industry can help you to develop your skills – all which can be transferable once the opportunity arises.

Employers want to see that you can not only do a job, but that you’ll fit in with the team, that you can work independently and responsibly. You can show these skills in any job so don’t be afraid to showcase what you’ve learnt when you need to.  

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We’re Aviation Job Search, the biggest job site in the world that specialises in just aviation jobs. We work hard to bring together all the latest aviation jobs, news and advice all under one roof. Our team speak daily with the world’s biggest employers and recruitment agencies to keep you right up to date with all the latest opportunities. If you’re looking to make your next career move, why not start your journey right now with us.

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Register now for Flight Crew Futures

Reflecting the global demand for pilots, Flight Crew Futures ​is a major recruitment event which supports commercial pilots, plus recently-graduated ATPLs and low-hour candidates, by providing an opportunity to explore new and exciting career progression opportunities under one roof . The fourth Flight Crew Futures ​event ​will be held at the London Gatwick Hilton​ on Wednesday 17 October 2018. ​

Entry is free and candidates can drop-in anytime between 1000-1600. Wendy Pursey, Head of Membership and Career Services at BALPA, and a supporter of the event, said Flight Crew Futures​ is: “Attended by pilots who are thinking about a change of career, thinking about going to different airlines. They are able to speak to those airlines directly and get honest feedback.”

“They are able to speak to those airlines directly and get honest feedback.”

“Flight Crew Futures​ will partner visiting pilots with airlines and agencies who are seeking to recruit either experienced, low-hour (fATPL) or newly-graduated ATPL cadets,” says Darran Ward, FCF Event Manager. “FCF offers a great chance to meet directly with the ​ airlines and pilot recruiters in a single venue, and gather all the facts and career advice in an informal environment. “

In addition, we’ve extended the reach of FCF to include recently graduated ATPLs, to assist ​ next-generation pilots in securing their first FO position and help low-hour candidates start their career.”

 

Register now

To register for FREE​ and to view which recruiters will be attending FCF​ at the London Gatwick Hilton​ on Wednesday 17 October​, please visit www.pilotcareernews.com/live/flightcrew/

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By Patricia Green As part of your cabin crew initial training and then your yearly recurrent check, you will learn and have to pass modules in aviation health and medicine. This gives you an advanced first aid training especially applicable to working at altitude, being onboard an aircraft and potential risks of illness/stress/fatigue when flying. Serious incidents are rare, but you may face day to day small issues due to cuts, fear of flying, nausea, ear problems and so on. It is rare to have assistance onboard to deal with medical scenarios, so it is your responsibility as a crew member to know how to spot, diagnose and treat potential medical issues. Here we break down what aviation health and medicine is and what you should know by the end of your training. Decompression in the cabin Physiology of flight is a crucial element and the first thing you will learn – what flying and altitude do to the body and the conditions that may occur or be affected. Air and gas inside the body will expand as altitude increases and can cause pain in the ears, sinus, abdomen, lungs and teeth. Serious conditions such as lung disease and heart disease may require therapeutic oxygen onboard. The use of oxygen and knowledge of oxygen systems on the aircraft is important as after a decompression for example (lowering of cabin pressure due to loss of a window/hole in fuselage) gives only minutes for passengers and crew to obtain oxygen before they may be rendered unconscious, depending on whether it is a slow or rapid decompression. Both can be fatal if not understood properly and you will learn the signs of decompression in the cabin (fog in cabin, rushing sound, cold air, fluids boiling over and objects moving around) during your emergency procedures training. You will learn the signs of hypoxia too which would occur during decompression, which include breathing rapidly, confusion, sleepiness and euphoria – this unrecognized is fatal and can potentially affect all crew and passengers if oxygen is not received – hence the automatic dropping of oxygen masks when the cabin altitude reaches 14,000 feet. Other conditions and medical emergencies covered during your training include: • Asthma, shock, choking, heart attack and stroke • Stress reactions and allergic reactions, gastro-intestinal disturbance • Epilepsy, diabetes, febrile convulsions, poisoning • Hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia • Childbirth • Burns, wounds, fractures, soft tissue injuries • CPR (Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation), Unconsciousness • Common problems for passengers include dehydration, hyperventilation, nose bleed and air sickness You will also learn about the medicines available onboard, the first aid kits and how to use them and emergency equipment such as the defibrillator and oxygen bottles. Ultimately, a cabin crew member should be able to: • Assess and observe passenger/crew condition • Identify the illness or injury • Give appropriate and immediate treatment • Prevent the condition deteriorating and promote recovery until landing and receiving medical assistance on the ground. Other topics considered during training are travel health (avoiding malaria, vaccinations and infectious diseases as well as appropriate eating), crew health (staying healthy and fit as a crew member) and sleep physiology (circadian rhythm and fatigue). You also will learn about such things as hygiene onboard, disinfecting the aircraft, disposing of clinical waste and what to do in case of death onboard. This training session is usually covered within 5 days and you will have to perform and pass a written exam as well as a practical exam covering CPR, unconsciousness and use of the defibrillator. Your aviation health and medicine training is not just essential for the role of cabin crew but will serve you well in daily life as you never know when first aid is needed and one day you just may save a life. About the author: Patricia Green has been Cabin Crew for major airlines in the UK and Middle East for seven years and also an SCCM. She has also worked as a VIP Flight Attendant working for very high profile clients and world leaders on their private jets. Last year Patricia moved to flying on a freelance basis in order to concentrate on working as a freelance instructor as well as setting up as a Cabin Crew Consultant. She advises potential crew how to get their dream job and helps experienced crew move from commercial to corporate flying. In response to many requests from fellow crew and students, Patricia has written a series of E-books to help guide new crew with lots of insider advice and useful hints and tips. For more information please visit www.cabincrewconsultant.weebly.com

Why A Personal Statement Is Essential For Your Cabin Crew CV

If you are applying for Cabin Crew roles, then you are in a competitive market. Furthermore, the experience on your CV can sometimes be similar to other candidates. So, how can you make sure your CV stands out and gets recognised in a swathe of...

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An airline captain has overall responsibility for the safe and efficient operation of the aircraft and the safety of crew and passengers. They will be concerned with the airworthiness of the plane, weather factors affecting the flight, flight regulations, and air traffic control procedures.

How to land your dream job – fast

Searching for a new job? We wouldn't be surprised, since 88% of aviation professionals told us they would be in 2019.    We all know that a job search can be frustrating. But on the whole, the opportunity to land your dream job is an exciting...